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7 Essential Words of Fall

barrow1

[bar-oh] /ˈbær oʊ/
noun
1.
a flat, rectangular frame used for carrying a load, especially such a frame with projecting shafts at each end for handles; handbarrow.
2.
3.
British. a pushcart used by street vendors, especially by costermongers.
Origin
1000
before 1000; Middle English bar(e)we, Old English bearwe; akin to Middle High German bere, bier, bear1

barrow2

[bar-oh] /ˈbær oʊ/
noun
1.
Archaeology, tumulus (def 1).
2.
Chiefly British. a hill (sometimes used in combination):
Trentishoe Barrow in North Devon; Whitbarrow in North Lancashire.
Origin
before 900; Middle English berw, beruh, bargh, berg(h), Old English beorg hill, mound; cognate with Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Dutch, Old High German berg mountain, Old Norse bjarg, berg cliff, Armenian berdz height, Welsh bera heap; akin to Avestan bərəz-, bərəzant-, Sanskrit bṛhánt- high. See borough

barrow3

[bar-oh] /ˈbær oʊ/
noun
1.
a castrated male swine.
Origin
before 1000; Middle English barowe, baru, Old English bearg; cognate with Old High German barug, Old Norse bǫrgr. Cf. bore1, whose meaning is close to the semantics of cutting or splitting (referring to castration)

Barrow

[bar-oh] /ˈbær oʊ/
noun
1.
Also called Barrow-in-Furness
[bar-oh-in-fur-nis] /ˈbær oʊ ɪnˈfɜr nɪs/ (Show IPA)
. a seaport in Cumbria, in NW England.
2.
Point, the N tip of Alaska: the northernmost point of the U.S.
3.
a town in N Alaska, S of Barrow Point: site of a government science-research center.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for barrow
  • They will be the barrow boys quick on their feet and lacking any scruples.
  • Again, so much depends upon a red wheel barrow your point of departure.
  • Hefting our suitcases into the barrow, he told us supper was waiting for us.
  • Italians can recognize snake oil salesmen and barrow boys when they see them and will trust them as far as they can throw them.
  • There is a tradition that in the barrow above the earthworks is placed a box of bright gold.
British Dictionary definitions for barrow

barrow1

/ˈbærəʊ/
noun
2.
Also called barrowful. the amount contained in or on a barrow
3.
(mainly Brit) a handcart, typically having two wheels and a canvas roof, used esp by street vendors
4.
(Northern English, dialect) concern or business (esp in the phrases that's not my barrow, that's just my barrow)
5.
(Irish & Scot, dialect) into one's barrow, suited to one's interests or desires
Word Origin
Old English bearwe; related to Old Norse bararbier, Old High German bāra

barrow2

/ˈbærəʊ/
noun
1.
a heap of earth placed over one or more prehistoric tombs, often surrounded by ditches. Long barrows are elongated Neolithic mounds usually covering stone burial chambers; round barrows are Bronze Age, covering burials or cremations
Word Origin
Old English beorg; related to Old Norse bjarg, Gothic bairgahei hill, Old High German berg mountain

barrow3

/ˈbærəʊ/
noun
1.
a castrated pig
Word Origin
Old English bearg; related to Old Norse börgr, Old High German barug

Barrow

/ˈbærəʊ/
noun
1.
a river in SE Ireland, rising in the Slieve Bloom Mountains and flowing south to Waterford Harbour. Length: about 193 km (120 miles)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for barrow
n.

"vehicle for carrying a load," c.1300, barewe, probably from an unrecorded Old English *bearwe "basket, barrow," from beran "to bear, to carry" (see bear (v.)). The original had no wheel and required two persons to carry it.

"mound," Old English beorg (West Saxon), berg (Anglian) "barrow, mountain, hill, mound," from Proto-Germanic *bergaz (cf. Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Old High German berg "mountain," Old North bjarg "rock"), from PIE root *bheregh- "high, elevated" (cf. Old Church Slavonic bregu "mountain, height," Old Irish brigh "mountain," Sanskrit b'rhant "high," Old Persian bard- "be high"). Obsolete except in place-names and southwest England dialect by 1400; revived by modern archaeology.

In place-names used of small continuously curving hills, smaller than a dun, with the summit typically occupied by a single farmstead or by a village church with the village beside the hill, and also of burial mounds. [Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names]
Meaning "mound erected over a grave" was a specific sense in late Old English. Barrow-wight first recorded 1869 in Eirikr Magnusson and William Morris's translation of the Icelandic saga of Grettir the Strong.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for barrow

tumulus

in England, ancient burial place covered with a large mound of earth. In Scotland, Ireland, and Wales the equivalent term is cairn. Barrows were constructed in England from Neolithic (c. 4000 BC) until late pre-Christian (c. AD 600) times. Barrows of the Neolithic Period were long and contained the various members of a family or clan, while those of the Early Bronze Age (c. 1900 BC) were round in shape and were used to bury a single important individual, perhaps a chief or clan leader. The bodies were placed in stone or wooden vaults, over which large mounds of soil were heaped. Both types of barrows continued to be used in England until the advent of Christianity. Their sites are most common in the county of Wiltshire.

Learn more about tumulus with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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