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beak

[beek] /bik/
noun
1.
the bill of a bird; neb.
2.
any similar horny mouthpart in other animals, as the turtle or duckbill.
3.
anything beaklike or ending in a point, as the spout of a pitcher.
4.
Slang. a person's nose.
5.
Entomology, proboscis (def 3).
6.
Botany. a narrowed or prolonged tip.
7.
Nautical. (formerly) a metal or metal-sheathed projection from the bow of a warship, used to ram enemy vessels; ram; rostrum.
8.
Typography. a serif on the arm of a character, as of a K.
9.
Also called bird's beak. Architecture. a pendant molding forming a drip, as on the soffit of a cornice.
10.
Chiefly British Slang.
  1. a judge; magistrate.
  2. a schoolmaster.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English bec < Old French < Latin beccus < Gaulish
Related forms
beaked
[beekt, bee-kid] /bikt, ˈbi kɪd/ (Show IPA),
adjective
beakless, adjective
beaklike, adjective
beaky, adjective
underbeak, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for beaked

beak1

/biːk/
noun
1.
the projecting jaws of a bird, covered with a horny sheath; bill
2.
any beaklike mouthpart in other animals, such as turtles
3.
(slang) a person's nose, esp one that is large, pointed, or hooked
4.
any projecting part, such as the pouring lip of a bucket
5.
(architect) the upper surface of a cornice, which slopes out to throw off water
6.
(chem) the part of a still or retort through which vapour passes to the condenser
7.
(nautical) another word for ram (sense 5)
Derived Forms
beaked (biːkt) adjective
beakless, adjective
beaklike, adjective
beaky, adjective
Word Origin
C13: from Old French bec, from Latin beccus, of Gaulish origin

beak2

/biːk/
noun
1.
a Brit slang word for judge, magistrate, headmaster, schoolmaster
Word Origin
C19: originally thieves' jargon
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for beaked

beak

n.

mid-13c., "bird's bill," from Old French bec "beak," figuratively "mouth," also "tip or point of a nose, a lance, a ship, a shoe," from Latin beccus (cf. Italian becco, Spanish pico), said by Suetonius ("De vita Caesarum" 18) to be of Gaulish origin, perhaps from Gaulish beccus, possibly related to Celtic stem bacc- "hook." Or there may be a link in Old English becca "pickax, sharp end." Jocular sense of "human nose" is from 1854 (but also was used mid-15c. in the same sense).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for beaked

beak

noun
  1. A mayor, magistrate, or trial judge •Still current in British slang (1830s+)
  2. The nose: The beak-buster in the opening round was the first punch Moore had thrown

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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13
14
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