beastlike

beast

[beest]
noun
1.
any nonhuman animal, especially a large, four-footed mammal.
2.
the crude animal nature common to humans and the lower animals: Hunger brought out the beast in him.
3.
a cruel, coarse, filthy, or otherwise beastlike person.
4.
a live creature, as distinguished from a plant: What manner of beast is this?
5.
the beast, the Antichrist. Rev. 13:18.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English be(e)ste < Old French beste (French bête) < Latin bēstia

beastlike, adjective


1. See animal. 3. cad, swine, pig, brute, savage, ogre, monster, barbarian.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
beast (biːst)
 
n
1.  any animal other than man, esp a large wild quadruped
2.  savage nature or characteristics: the beast in man
3.  a brutal, uncivilized, or filthy person
 
vb
4.  military slang, slang chiefly (Brit) (tr) to punish or torture (someone) in a manner that involves excessive physical exercise
 
[C13: from Old French beste, from Latin bestia, of obscure origin]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

beast
early 13c., from O.Fr. beste (11c., Mod.Fr. bête) "animal, wild beast," figuratively "fool, idiot;" from L. bestia "beast, wild animal," of unknown origin. replacing O.E. deor (see deer) as the generic word for "wild creature," only to be ousted 16c. by animal.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang Dictionary

beast definition


  1. n.
    an ugly person. : That beast should give the monkey back its face before the poor creature bumps into something.
  2. n.
    a crude, violent, or sexually aggressive male; an animal. : Oh, Martin, you're such a beast!
  3. n.
    liquor. : Pour me some more of that beast.
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Beast definition


This word is used of flocks or herds of grazing animals (Ex. 22:5; Num. 20:4, 8, 11; Ps. 78:48); of beasts of burden (Gen. 45:17); of eatable beasts (Prov. 9:2); and of swift beasts or dromedaries (Isa. 60:6). In the New Testament it is used of a domestic animal as property (Rev. 18:13); as used for food (1 Cor. 15:39), for service (Luke 10:34; Acts 23:24), and for sacrifice (Acts 7:42). When used in contradistinction to man (Ps. 36:6), it denotes a brute creature generally, and when in contradistinction to creeping things (Lev. 11:2-7; 27:26), a four-footed animal. The Mosaic law required that beasts of labour should have rest on the Sabbath (Ex. 20:10; 23:12), and in the Sabbatical year all cattle were allowed to roam about freely, and eat whatever grew in the fields (Ex. 23:11; Lev. 25:7). No animal could be castrated (Lev. 22:24). Animals of different kinds were to be always kept separate (Lev. 19:19; Deut. 22:10). Oxen when used in threshing were not to be prevented from eating what was within their reach (Deut. 25:4; 1 Cor.9:9). This word is used figuratively of an infuriated multitude (1 Cor. 15:32; Acts 19:29; comp. Ps. 22:12, 16; Eccl. 3:18; Isa. 11:6-8), and of wicked men (2 Pet. 2:12). The four beasts of Daniel 7:3, 17, 23 represent four kingdoms or kings.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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