follow Dictionary.com

Is Tuesday named for a one-handed god?

bedraggled

[bih-drag-uh ld] /bɪˈdræg əld/
adjective
1.
limp and soiled, as with rain or dirt.
Origin
Related forms
unbedraggled, adjective

bedraggle

[bih-drag-uh l] /bɪˈdræg əl/
verb (used with object), bedraggled, bedraggling.
1.
to make limp and soiled, as with rain or dirt.
Origin
1720-30; be- + draggle
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for bedraggled
  • The emergency rooms of this bedraggled region are facing their own emergency.
  • Newspapers across the country published pictures of one of its cars being towed to a dealer by four bedraggled horses.
  • Gold discovered at those sites over a century ago transformed bedraggled prospectors into instant millionaires.
  • His resignation leaves the coalition even more bedraggled.
  • The three are starving, bedraggled and wracked by tropical fevers.
  • For all the bedraggled look of the mattress-and-sleeping-bag-strewn camp, it has a structure and routine.
  • We were superficially bedraggled but fundamentally sturdy.
  • By the time she emerged, bedraggled but clear-headed, she knew what to do: make a sitcom about being fat.
  • Nonetheless, he cautioned that lower rates might not be able to ease the problems in the bedraggled credit markets.
  • There are photographs of dapper poseurs as well as skinny yeshiva boys, vacation revelers as well as bedraggled water-carriers.
British Dictionary definitions for bedraggled

bedraggled

/bɪˈdræɡəld/
adjective
1.
(of hair, clothing, etc) limp, untidy, or dirty, as with rain or mud

bedraggle

/bɪˈdræɡəl/
verb
1.
(transitive) to make (hair, clothing, etc) limp, untidy, or dirty, as with rain or mud
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for bedraggled
adj.

1727, past participle adjective from bedraggle.

bedraggle

v.

1727, from be- + draggle, frequentative of drag.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Word Value for bedraggled

16
20
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with bedraggled

Nearby words for bedraggled