beguile

[bih-gahyl]
verb (used with object), beguiled, beguiling.
1.
to influence by trickery, flattery, etc.; mislead; delude.
2.
to take away from by cheating or deceiving (usually followed by of ): to be beguiled of money.
3.
to charm or divert: a multitude of attractions to beguile the tourist.
4.
to pass (time) pleasantly: beguiling the long afternoon with a good book.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English bigilen. See be-, guile

beguilement, noun
beguiler, noun
unbeguiled, adjective
unbeguiling, adjective


1. deceive, cheat. 3. amuse, entertain.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
beguile (bɪˈɡaɪl)
 
vb (often foll by of or out of) , -guiles, -guiling, -guiled
1.  to charm; fascinate
2.  to delude; influence by slyness
3.  to deprive (someone) of something by trickery; cheat (someone) of
4.  to pass pleasantly; while away
 
be'guilement
 
n
 
be'guiler
 
n

beguiling (bɪˈɡaɪlɪŋ)
 
adj
1.  charming or fascinating
2.  using slyness to delude someone
 
beguilingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

beguile
early 13c., from be- + guile (v.). Pp. adj. beguiling is recorded from c.1400.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
But you can have a beguiling meal here and never taste a pie.
Rousing at outdoor rallies, in a small group he is disarmingly casual, even
  beguiling.
Wisely again, he does not stray too far down that beguiling track.
The rover sent home a beguiling but frustrating panorama showing a line of low
  hills to the southeast.
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