believe

[bih-leev]
verb (used without object), believed, believing.
1.
to have confidence in the truth, the existence, or the reliability of something, although without absolute proof that one is right in doing so: Only if one believes in something can one act purposefully.
verb (used with object), believed, believing.
2.
to have confidence or faith in the truth of (a positive assertion, story, etc.); give credence to.
3.
to have confidence in the assertions of (a person).
4.
to have a conviction that (a person or thing) is, has been, or will be engaged in a given action or involved in a given situation: The fugitive is believed to be headed for the Mexican border.
5.
to suppose or assume; understand (usually followed by a noun clause): I believe that he has left town.
Verb phrases
6.
believe in,
a.
to be persuaded of the truth or existence of: to believe in Zoroastrianism; to believe in ghosts.
b.
to have faith in the reliability, honesty, benevolence, etc., of: I can help only if you believe in me.
Idioms
7.
make believe. make ( def 46 ).

Origin:
1150–1200; Middle English bileven, equivalent to bi- be- + leven, Old English (Anglian) gelēfan (cognate with Dutch gelooven, German glauben, Gothic galaubjan)

believability, believableness, noun
believable, adjective
believably, adverb
believer, noun
believingly, adverb
half-believed, adjective
half-believing, adjective
prebelieve, verb, prebelieved, prebelieving.
prebeliever, noun
superbelievable, adjective
superbelievableness, noun
superbelievably, adverb
well-believed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
believe (bɪˈliːv)
 
vb (foll by in)
1.  (tr; may take a clause as object) to accept (a statement, supposition, or opinion) as true: I believe God exists
2.  (tr) to accept the statement or opinion of (a person) as true
3.  to be convinced of the truth or existence (of): to believe in fairies
4.  (intr) to have religious faith
5.  (when tr, takes a clause as object) to think, assume, or suppose: I believe that he has left already
6.  (tr; foll by of; used with can, could, would, etc) to think that someone is able to do (a particular action): I wouldn't have believed it of him
 
[Old English beliefan]
 
be'lievability
 
n
 
be'lievable
 
adj
 
be'lievably
 
adv
 
be'liever
 
n
 
be'lieving
 
n, —adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

believe
O.E. belyfan "to believe," earlier geleafa (Mercian), gelefa (Northumbrian), gelyfan (W.Saxon) "believe," from P.Gmc. *ga-laubjan "hold dear, love" (cf. O.S. gilobian, Du. geloven, O.H.G. gilouben, Ger. glauben), from PIE base *leubh- "to like, desire" (see love). Spelling
beleeve is common till 17c.; then altered perhaps by influence of relieve. To believe on instead of in was more common in 16c. but now is a peculiarity of theology; believe of also sometimes was used in 17c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
From the lettering you can still read on a few of them he believes they were
  old machine shop tool bins.
They set the mood and create the magic, she believes.
He believes a restored park will lift this beleaguered region out of poverty.
He believes words are much more than instruments of communication.
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