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benefactor

[ben-uh-fak-ter, ben-uh-fak-] /ˈbɛn əˌfæk tər, ˌbɛn əˈfæk-/
noun
1.
a person who confers a benefit; kindly helper.
2.
a person who makes a bequest or endowment, as to an institution.
Origin
late Middle English
1425-1475
1425-75; late Middle English benefactour < Late Latin; see bene-, factor
Synonyms
2. patron, supporter, sponsor, backer, protector.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for benefactors
  • Members and benefactors have generously donated art and funds to expand the collections.
  • Thus big and little stars are unlikely to serve as benefactors of life.
  • These few are the flowers of their species,-its ornaments and benefactors,-for the flower nourishes and exalts the whole.
  • Some of the benefactors would be the morbidly obese.
  • The ploy suggests a cargo cult, setting out lures for prospective benefactors.
  • She has dug its buildings out of the dust and pried cash from the grip of reluctant benefactors.
  • Abundant animals in the environment would have shared in the harvest, even if only while their human benefactors slept.
  • Its simply not good enough to have a go at the political system and its benefactors.
  • Write thank-you notes to benefactors and network socially with prospective students.
  • Its prescient board members, acquisition committee members and benefactors did, too.
British Dictionary definitions for benefactors

benefactor

/ˈbɛnɪˌfæktə; ˌbɛnɪˈfæk-/
noun
1.
a person who supports or helps a person, institution, etc, esp by giving money; patron
Derived Forms
benefactress, noun:feminine
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for benefactors

benefactor

n.

mid-15c., from Late Latin benefactor, from Latin phrase bene facere, from bene "well" (see bene-) + facere "to do" (see factitious). Translated in Old English as wel-doend.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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18
21
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