bias

[bahy-uhs]
noun
1.
an oblique or diagonal line of direction, especially across a woven fabric.
2.
a particular tendency or inclination, especially one that prevents unprejudiced consideration of a question; prejudice.
3.
Statistics. a systematic as opposed to a random distortion of a statistic as a result of sampling procedure.
4.
Lawn Bowling.
a.
a slight bulge or greater weight on one side of the ball or bowl.
b.
the curved course made by such a ball when rolled.
5.
Electronics. the application of a steady voltage or current to an active device, as a diode or transistor, to produce a desired mode of operation.
6.
a high-frequency alternating current applied to the recording head of a tape recorder during recording in order to reduce distortion.
adjective
7.
cut, set, folded, etc., diagonally: This material requires a bias cut.
adverb
8.
in a diagonal manner; obliquely; slantingly: to cut material bias.
verb (used with object), biased, biasing or (especially British) biassed, biassing.
9.
to cause partiality or favoritism in (a person); influence, especially unfairly: a tearful plea designed to bias the jury.
10.
Electronics. to apply a steady voltage or current to (the input of an active device).
Idioms
11.
on the bias,
a.
in the diagonal direction of the cloth.
b.
out of line; slanting.

Origin:
1520–30; < Middle French biais oblique < Old Provençal, probably < Vulgar Latin *(e)bigassius < Greek epikársios oblique, equivalent to epi- epi- + -karsios oblique

subbias, noun
superbias, noun


2. predisposition, preconception, predilection, partiality, proclivity; bent, leaning. Bias, prejudice mean a strong inclination of the mind or a preconceived opinion about something or someone. A bias may be favorable or unfavorable: bias in favor of or against an idea. Prejudice implies a preformed judgment even more unreasoning than bias and usually implies an unfavorable opinion: prejudice against a race. 9. predispose, bend, incline, dispose.


2. impartiality.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

Bias

[bahy-uhs]
noun
flourished 570 b.c, Greek philosopher, born in Ionia.

Bia

[bahy-uh]
noun
the ancient Greek personification of force: daughter of Pallas and Styx and sister of Cratus, Nike, and Zelos.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To bias
Collins
World English Dictionary
bias (ˈbaɪəs)
 
n
1.  mental tendency or inclination, esp an irrational preference or prejudice
2.  a diagonal line or cut across the weave of a fabric
3.  electronics the voltage applied to an electronic device or system to establish suitable working conditions
4.  bowls
 a.  a bulge or weight inside one side of a bowl
 b.  the curved course of such a bowl on the green
5.  statistics
 a.  an extraneous latent influence on, unrecognized conflated variable in, or selectivity in a sample which influences its distribution and so renders it unable to reflect the desired population parameters
 b.  if T is an estimator of the parameter θ, the expected value of (T--θ)
6.  an inaudible high-frequency signal used to improve the quality of a tape recording
 
adj
7.  slanting obliquely; diagonal: a bias fold
 
adv
8.  obliquely; diagonally
 
vb , -ases, -asing, -ased, -asses, -assing, -assed
9.  (usually passive) to cause to have a bias; prejudice; influence
 
[C16: from Old French biais, from Old Provençal, perhaps ultimately from Greek epikarsios oblique]
 
'biased
 
adj
 
'biassed
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

bias
1520s, from Fr. biais "slant, oblique," also figuratively, "expedient, means" (13c., in O.Fr. "sideways, askance, against the grain"), from O.Prov. biais, with cognates in Old Catalan and Sardinian; possibly from V.L. *(e)bigassius, from Gk. epikarsios "athwart, crosswise, at an angle," from epi- "upon"
+ karsios "oblique," from PIE *krs-yo-, from base *(s)ker- "to cut." A pp. adjective that became a noun in Old French. Transferred sense of "predisposition, prejudice" is from 1570s.
"[A] technical term in the game of bowls, whence come all the later uses of the word." [OED]
The verb is from 1620s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Abbreviations & Acronyms
BIA
  1. Brain Injury Association

  2. Bureau of Indian Affairs

The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Example sentences
The headlong bias to utility will let no talent lie in a napkin,-if possible,
  will teach spiders to weave silk stockings.
Furthermore, there is a general disposition to favor the way of the
  fox-although this may be entirely my own bias.
Each team member must be willing to look at a situation objectively and let go
  of resentment and bias.
If the bias can be changed, perhaps the behavior will follow.
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