bides

bide

[bahyd]
verb (used with object), bided or bode; bided or (Archaic) bid; biding.
1.
Archaic. to endure; bear.
2.
Obsolete. to encounter.
verb (used without object), bided or bode; bided or (Archaic) bid; biding.
3.
to dwell; abide; wait; remain.
Idioms
4.
bide one's time, to wait for a favorable opportunity: He wanted to ask for a raise, but bided his time.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English biden, Old English bīdan; cognate with Old Frisian bīdia, Old Saxon bīdan, Old High German bītan, Old Norse bītha, Gothic beidan, Latin fīdere, Greek peíthesthai to trust, rely < Indo-European *bheidh-; the meaning apparently developed: have trust > endure > wait > abide > remain

bider, noun


3. stay, linger, tarry.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
bide (baɪd)
 
vb , bides, biding, bided, bode, bided
1.  archaic, dialect or (intr) to continue in a certain place or state; stay
2.  archaic, dialect or (intr) to live; dwell
3.  archaic, dialect or (tr) to tolerate; endure
4.  (Scot) bide a wee to stay a little
5.  (Scot) bide by to abide by
6.  bide one's time to wait patiently for an opportunity
 
[Old English bīdan; related to Old Norse bītha to wait, Gothic beidan, Old High German bītan]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

bide
O.E. bidan "to stay, continue, live, remain," also "to trust, rely" (cognate of O.N. biða, O.Fris. bidia, Goth. beidan "to wait"), apparently from PIE *bheidh-, an extended stem of one root of O.E. biddan (see bid), the original sense of which was "to command," and "to trust"
(cf. Gk. peithein "to persuade," pistis "faith;" L. fidere "to trust," foedus "compact, treaty," O.C.S. beda "need"). Perhaps the sense evolved in prehistoric times through "endure," and "endure a wait," to "to wait." Preserved in Scotland and northern England, replaced elsewhere by abide in all senses except to bide one's time.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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