blood count

noun
the count of the number of red and white blood cells and platelets in a specific volume of blood.

Origin:
1895–1900

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Collins
World English Dictionary
blood count
 
n
See haemocytometer the number of red and white blood corpuscles and platelets in a specific sample of blood

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

blood count n.

  1. Calculation of the number of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets in a cubic millimeter of blood by counting the cells in an accurate volume of diluted blood.

  2. The determination of the percentages of various types of white blood cells observed in a stained film of blood.

  3. Complete blood count.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
blood count  
See complete blood count.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

blood count

laboratory test that determines the number of red blood cells (erythrocytes) and white blood cells (leukocytes) in a given volume of blood. The readings vary with sex, age, physiological state, and general health, but the blood of a normal individual contains on average 5,000,000 red cells and 7,000 white cells per cubic millimetre. A differential blood count is the percentage of each type of white blood cell per 100 white cells counted; the white cells of a normal adult are about 55 percent neutrophils, 30 percent lymphocytes, and small percentages of eosinophils, basophils, and monocytes. A decrease in the number of red blood cells is usually associated with anemia, and an increase or decrease in the number of white blood cells can occur with infections, inflammatory conditions, or leukemia. A blood count may also include a determination of the number of platelets, the volume by percent of red blood cells in whole blood (known as a hematocrit), the sedimentation rate of the red blood cells, the hemoglobin concentration of the red cells, and the average size of the red cells

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Such tests include a complete blood count to measure the number of white blood cells.
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