brandish

[bran-dish]
verb (used with object)
1.
to shake or wave, as a weapon; flourish: Brandishing his sword, he rode into battle.
noun
2.
a flourish or waving, as of a weapon.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English bra(u)ndisshen < Anglo-French, Middle French brandiss- (long stem of brandir, derivative of brand sword < Gmc). See brand, -ish2

brandisher, noun


1. swing, flaunt, wield, display.
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World English Dictionary
brandish (ˈbrændɪʃ)
 
vb
1.  to wave or flourish (a weapon) in a triumphant, threatening, or ostentatious way
 
n
2.  a threatening or defiant flourish
 
[C14: from Old French brandir, from brand sword, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German brant weapon]
 
'brandisher
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

brandish
mid-14c., from O.Fr. brandiss-, prp. stem of brandir "to flourish (a sword)" (12c.), from brant "blade of a sword, prow of a ship," of Frankish origin (see brand). Related: Brandished; brandishing.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
At one point in his talk, the lively speaker brandished an executioner's knife
  that was nearly used on his own neck.
The gun owner did not shoot the weapon but brandished it with menace.
In the first and third robberies, the suspects brandished a shotgun and a
  semi-automatic handgun.
During the second robbery, both suspects brandished semi-automatic handguns.
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