brookable

brook

2 [brook]
verb (used with object)
to bear; suffer; tolerate: I will brook no interference.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English brouken, Old English brūcan; cognate with Dutch bruiken, German brauchen; akin to Gothic brukjan, Latin fruī to enjoy

brookable, adjective


take, stand, endure, abide, stomach.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
brook1 (brʊk)
 
n
a natural freshwater stream smaller than a river
 
[Old English brōc; related to Old High German bruoh swamp, Dutch broek]

brook2 (brʊk)
 
vb
(tr; usually used with a negative) to bear; tolerate
 
[Old English brūcan; related to Gothic brūkjan to use, Old High German brūhhan, Latin fruī to enjoy]
 
'brookable2
 
adj

Brook (brʊk)
 
n
Peter (Paul Stephen). born 1925, British stage and film director, noted esp for his experimental work in the theatre

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

brook
"small stream," O.E. broc "flowing stream, torrest," of obscure origin, probably from P.Gmc. *broka- which yielded words in Ger. (Bruch) and Du. (broek) that have a sense of "marsh." In Sussex and Kent, it means "water-meadow," and in plural, "low, marshy ground."

brook
"to endure," O.E. brucan "use, ennjoy, possess; eat; cohabit with," from P.Gmc. *bruk- "to make use of, enjoy" (cf. O.S. brukan, O.Fris. bruka, O.H.G. bruhhan, Ger. brauchen "to use," Goth. brukjan), from PIE base *bhrug- "to make use of, have enjoyment of" (cf. L. fructus). Sense of "use" applied to
food led to "be able to digest," and by 16c. to "tolerate."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Brook definition


a torrent. (1.) Applied to small streams, as the Arnon, Jabbok, etc. Isaiah (15:7) speaks of the "book of the willows," probably the Wady-el-Asha. (2.) It is also applied to winter torrents (Job 6:15; Num. 34:5; Josh. 15:4, 47), and to the torrent-bed or wady as well as to the torrent itself (Num. 13:23; 1 Kings 17:3). (3.) In Isa. 19:7 the river Nile is meant, as rendered in the Revised Version.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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