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brute1

[broot] /brut/
noun
1.
a nonhuman creature; beast.
2.
a brutal, insensitive, or crude person.
3.
the animal qualities, desires, etc., of humankind:
Father felt that rough games brought out the brute in us.
adjective
4.
animal; not human.
5.
not characterized by intelligence or reason; irrational.
6.
characteristic of animals; of brutal character or quality.
7.
savage; cruel:
brute force.
8.
carnal; sensual.
Origin
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English < Middle French < Latin brūtus heavy, devoid of feeling, irrational
Related forms
brutelike, adjective
brutely, adverb
bruteness, noun
Synonyms
1. See animal.

brute2

[broot] /brut/
verb (used with object), bruted, bruting.
1.
to shape (a diamond) by rubbing with another diamond or a diamond chip.
Origin
back formation from bruting a rough hewing (of a diamond), partial translation of French brutage literally, a roughing, equivalent to brut rough, raw (see brute1) + -age -age

et tu, Brute

[et too broo-tey] /ɛt ˈtu ˈbru teɪ/
Latin.
1.
and thou, Brutus!: alleged dying words of Julius Caesar uttered as his friend Brutus stabbed him.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for brute
  • In her lifelong study of the human species, she has discovered that even in academe, someone who appears to be a brute is a brute.
  • From behind her, a beefy brute with a scar on his cheek clamps a meaty hand over her mouth.
  • Skilful play is being stifled by illegal interference and brute aggression.
  • As today's books on global warming show, there is more to a story than brute facts.
  • Nature, the brute fact of existence the ultimate ontology, prevails.
  • brute strength or the possession of muscles, people are still threatened by that.
  • But a referendum, however resounding its verdict, cannot overturn the brute facts of demography and geography.
  • Climbing requires more concentration, creativity and balance than brute strength.
  • brute strength makes up for a lack of finesse, if you don't care about sliding into anything.
  • Such are the brute facts of biology, which can only evolve because some living things are better at reproducing than others.
British Dictionary definitions for brute

brute

/bruːt/
noun
1.
  1. any animal except man; beast; lower animal
  2. (as modifier) brute nature
2.
a brutal person
adjective (prenominal)
3.
wholly instinctive or physical (esp in the phrases brute strength, brute force)
4.
without reason or intelligence
5.
coarse and grossly sensual
Word Origin
C15: from Latin brūtus heavy, irrational; related to gravis heavy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for brute
brute
early 15c., "of or belonging to animals," from M.Fr. brut "coarse, brutal, raw, crude," from L. brutus "heavy, dull, stupid," an Oscan word, from PIE base *gwer- "heavy" (see grave (adj.)). Before reaching English the meaning expanded to "of the lower animals." Used of human beings from 1530s. The noun is from 1610s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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