brute

1 [broot]
noun
1.
a nonhuman creature; beast.
2.
a brutal, insensitive, or crude person.
3.
the animal qualities, desires, etc., of humankind: Father felt that rough games brought out the brute in us.
adjective
4.
animal; not human.
5.
not characterized by intelligence or reason; irrational.
6.
characteristic of animals; of brutal character or quality.
7.
savage; cruel: brute force.
8.
carnal; sensual.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Middle French < Latin brūtus heavy, devoid of feeling, irrational

brutelike, adjective
brutely, adverb
bruteness, noun


1. See animal.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

brute

2 [broot]
verb (used with object), bruted, bruting.
to shape (a diamond) by rubbing with another diamond or a diamond chip.

Origin:
back formation from bruting a rough hewing (of a diamond), partial translation of French brutage literally, a roughing, equivalent to brut rough, raw (see brute1) + -age -age

et tu, Brute

[et too broo-tey]
Latin.
and thou, Brutus!: alleged dying words of Julius Caesar uttered as his friend Brutus stabbed him.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
brute (bruːt)
 
n
1.  a.  any animal except man; beast; lower animal
 b.  (as modifier): brute nature
2.  a brutal person
 
adj
3.  wholly instinctive or physical (esp in the phrases brute strength, brute force)
4.  without reason or intelligence
5.  coarse and grossly sensual
 
[C15: from Latin brūtus heavy, irrational; related to gravis heavy]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

brute
early 15c., "of or belonging to animals," from M.Fr. brut "coarse, brutal, raw, crude," from L. brutus "heavy, dull, stupid," an Oscan word, from PIE base *gwer- "heavy" (see grave (adj.)). Before reaching English the meaning expanded to "of the lower animals." Used of human
beings from 1530s. The noun is from 1610s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
In her lifelong study of the human species, she has discovered that even in
  academe, someone who appears to be a brute is a brute.
From behind her, a beefy brute with a scar on his cheek clamps a meaty hand
  over her mouth.
Skilful play is being stifled by illegal interference and brute aggression.
As today's books on global warming show, there is more to a story than brute
  facts.
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