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budget

[buhj-it] /ˈbʌdʒ ɪt/
noun
1.
an estimate, often itemized, of expected income and expense for a given period in the future.
2.
a plan of operations based on such an estimate.
3.
an itemized allotment of funds, time, etc., for a given period.
4.
the total sum of money set aside or needed for a purpose:
the construction budget.
5.
a limited stock or supply of something:
his budget of goodwill.
6.
Obsolete. a small bag; pouch.
adjective
7.
reasonably or cheaply priced:
budget dresses.
verb (used with object), budgeted, budgeting.
8.
to plan allotment of (funds, time, etc.).
9.
to deal with (specific funds) in a budget.
verb (used without object), budgeted, budgeting.
10.
to subsist on or live within a budget.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English bowgett < Middle French bougette (bouge bag (< Latin bulga; see bulge) + -ette -ette)
Related forms
budgetary
[buhj-i-ter-ee] /ˈbʌdʒ ɪˌtɛr i/ (Show IPA),
adjective
budgeter, noun
nonbudgetary, adjective
prebudget, noun, adjective
prebudgetary, adjective
pro-budgeting, adjective
rebudget, verb (used with object), rebudgeted, rebudgeting.
unbudgeted, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for budgetary
  • budgetary problems hamper reform of the health and pension systems of an aging population.
  • Higher crude oil prices countered declining oil production and led to higher budgetary and export receipts.
  • The tragedy here is that narrow political interests block that public interest from translating to budgetary support.
  • But even in other low-saving economies, budgetary prudence is the surest route to higher national saving.
  • By then several aspects will be clear, both on the inflation question and also on budgetary matters.
  • Nor will their fragmented democracies yield enough budgetary discipline.
  • Many other governors have taken similar approaches in the face of dire budgetary shortfalls and a sluggish economy.
  • As for buses, they do exist, but only the poor seem to be on them and routes are being cancelled for budgetary reasons.
  • It deepens its budgetary hole, because less tax is raised and more is spent on those out of work.
  • It is a public program whose future budgetary risks are highly transparent.
British Dictionary definitions for budgetary

budget

/ˈbʌdʒɪt/
noun
1.
an itemized summary of expected income and expenditure of a country, company, etc, over a specified period, usually a financial year
2.
an estimate of income and a plan for domestic expenditure of an individual or a family, often over a short period, such as a month or a week
3.
a restriction on expenditure (esp in the phrase on a budget)
4.
(modifier) economical; inexpensive: budget meals for a family
5.
the total amount of money allocated for a specific purpose during a specified period
6.
(archaic) a stock, quantity, or supply
verb -gets, -geting, -geted
7.
(transitive) to enter or provide for in a budget
8.
to plan the expenditure of (money, time, etc)
9.
(intransitive) to make a budget
Derived Forms
budgetary, adjective
Word Origin
C15 (meaning: leather pouch, wallet): from Old French bougette, diminutive of bouge, from Latin bulga, of Gaulish origin; compare Old English bælg bag

Budget

/ˈbʌdʒɪt/
noun
1.
the Budget, an estimate of British government expenditures and revenues and the financial plans for the ensuing fiscal year presented annually to the House of Commons by the Chancellor of the Exchequer
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for budgetary

budget

n.

early 15c., "leather pouch," from Middle French bougette, diminutive of Old French bouge "leather bag, wallet, pouch," from Latin bulga "leather bag," of Gaulish origin (cf. Old Irish bolg "bag," Breton bolc'h "flax pod"), from PIE *bhelgh- (see belly (n.)). Modern financial meaning (1733) is from notion of treasury minister keeping his fiscal plans in a wallet. Another 18c. transferred sense was "bundle of news," hence the use of the word as the title of some newspapers.

v.

"to include in a (fiscal) budget," 1884, from budget (n.). Related: Budgeted; budgeting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for budgetary

budget

adjective

Low-quality or cheap: No thanks on the budget toilet paper


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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16
18
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