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buggy2

[buhg-ee] /ˈbʌg i/
adjective, buggier, buggiest.
1.
infested with bugs.
2.
Slang. crazy; insane; peculiar.
Origin
1705-1715
1705-15; bug1 + -y1
Related forms
bugginess, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for bugginess

buggy1

/ˈbʌɡɪ/
noun (pl) -gies
1.
a light horse-drawn carriage having either four wheels (esp in the US and Canada) or two wheels (esp in Britain and India)
2.
short for beach buggy
3.
short for Baby Buggy See baby carriage
4.
a small motorized vehicle designed for a particular purpose: golf buggy, moon buggy
Word Origin
C18: of unknown origin

buggy2

/ˈbʌɡɪ/
adjective -gier, -giest
1.
infested with bugs
2.
(US, slang) insane
3.
(informal) (of a system or machine, esp a computer program) containing errors or faults
Derived Forms
bugginess, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for bugginess

buggy

n.

"light carriage," 1773, of unknown origin. Extended to baby carriages by 1890.

adj.

"infested with bugs," 1774, from bug (n.) + -y (2).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for bugginess

buggy 1

noun
  1. A caboose (1890s+ Railroad)
  2. A car, esp an old and rickety one; heap, jalopy: I wouldn't exactly call my Maserati a buggy (1925+)
Related Terms

horse-and-buggy


buggy 2

adjective

Crazy; bughouse, nuts (1900+)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Encyclopedia Article for bugginess

buggy

light, hooded (with a folding, or falling, top), two- or four-wheeled carriage of the 19th and early 20th centuries, usually pulled by one horse. In England, where the term seems to have originated late in the 18th century, the buggy held only one person and commonly had two wheels. By the mid-19th century the term had come to the United States and the buggy had become a four-wheeled carriage for two passengers. The shapes in which the vehicle was built varied widely. The coal-box buggy and, especially, the piano-box, or square-box, buggy enjoyed great popularity. Without a top a buggy was usually called a runabout, or a driving wagon, and if it had a standing top it was called a Jenny Lind.

Learn more about buggy with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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