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bung1

[buhng] /bʌŋ/
noun
1.
a stopper for the opening of a cask.
2.
verb (used with object)
3.
to close with or as if with a bung; cork; plug (often followed by up).
Origin of bung1
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English bunge < Middle Dutch bonge stopper

bung3

[buhng] /bʌŋ/
verb (used with object)
1.
to beat; bruise; maul (often followed by up).
2.
British Slang. to throw or shove carelessly or violently; sling.
Origin
1815-25; orig. Scots variant of bang1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for bunged
Historical Examples
  • Why, fancy me, eight years old, taken out of the village and bunged into a spinnin' mill!

  • He recked nothing of his bunged optic and the claret that flowed from his beezer.

    The Story of Louie Oliver Onions
  • Robert has seen me when I've been as ugly as sin, when my eyes have been bunged up with crying.

    The Immortal Moment May Sinclair
  • When he went into the house, mother's other eye had bunged for sympathy.

    On the Track Henry Lawson
  • Because I can't get any coal to-morrow—line's bunged up for the troops.

    The Amateur Army Patrick MacGill
  • Watching me with the eye that was not bunged up, Hassan guessed my perplexity.

    Allan and the Holy Flower H. Rider Haggard
  • She was a sight, with her eyes all bunged up and her cheeks sloppy.

    The Whole Family William Dean Howells, Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, Mary Heaton
  • Then he bunged up the mouth with a bit of soap—which he got on his thumb-nail from a pat in a saucer—and the straw was finished.

    Sons and Lovers David Herbert Lawrence
  • I've bunged up all the cracks,' Mr. Sidney shouted from within.

    A Diversity of Creatures Rudyard Kipling
  • My eyes were sometimes so bunged up that I couldn't see at all, and thanked my stars I was not driving leads.

    In the Ranks of the C.I.V. Erskine Childers
British Dictionary definitions for bunged

bung1

/bʌŋ/
noun
1.
a stopper, esp of cork or rubber, for a cask, piece of laboratory glassware, etc
2.
short for bunghole
verb (transitive)
3.
(often foll by up) to close or seal with or as with a bung: the car's exhaust was bunged up with mud
4.
(Brit & Austral, slang) to throw; sling
Word Origin
C15: from Middle Dutch bonghe, from Late Latin punctapuncture

bung2

/bʌŋ/
noun
1.
a gratuity; tip
2.
a bribe
verb
3.
(transitive) bung it on, to behave in a pretentious manner
Word Origin
C16 (originally in the sense: a purse): perhaps from Old English pung, changed over time through the influence of bung1

bung3

/bʌŋ/
adjective (Austral & NZ, informal)
1.
useless
2.
go bung
  1. to fail or collapse
  2. to die
Word Origin
C19: from a native Australian language
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for bunged

bung

n.

mid-15c., "large stopper for a cask," from Middle Dutch bonge "stopper;" or perhaps from French bonde "bung, bunghole" (15c.), which may be of Germanic origin (or the Germanic words may be borrowed from Romanic), or it may be from Gaulish *bunda (cf. Old Irish bonn, Gaelic bonn, Welsh bon "base, sole of the foot"). It is possible that either or both of these sources is ultimately from Latin puncta in the sense of "hole." Transferred to the cask-mouth itself (also bung-hole) from 1570s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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10
14
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