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bungle

[buhng-guh l] /ˈbʌŋ gəl/
verb (used with object), bungled, bungling.
1.
to do clumsily and awkwardly; botch:
He bungled the job.
verb (used without object), bungled, bungling.
2.
to perform or work clumsily or inadequately:
He is a fool who bungles consistently.
noun
3.
a bungling performance.
4.
that which has been done clumsily or inadequately.
Origin of bungle
1520-1530
1520-30; of uncertain origin
Related forms
bungler, noun
bunglingly, adverb
unbungling, adjective
Synonyms
1. mismanage, muddle, spoil, ruin; foul up.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for bungled
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • At some point, my good Dalny, you must have bungled the affair.

  • The game was at an end, and I had bungled my part of it like any fool.

    Bardelys the Magnificent Rafael Sabatini
  • What if I bungled those landings right there in front of that gang?

    Test Pilot David Goodger (goodger@python.org)
  • You think that the bungled matter at Newlington's may have shaken it?

    Mistress Wilding Rafael Sabatini
  • Besides, it is one of the most interesting cases that I have ever met with, and I am not going to see it bungled.

    The Vanishing Man R. Austin Freeman
British Dictionary definitions for bungled

bungle

/ˈbʌŋɡəl/
verb
1.
(transitive) to spoil (an operation) through clumsiness, incompetence, etc; botch
noun
2.
a clumsy or unsuccessful performance or piece of work; mistake; botch
Derived Forms
bungler, noun
bungling, adjective, noun
Word Origin
C16: perhaps of Scandinavian origin; compare dialect Swedish bangla to work without results
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for bungled

bungle

v.

1520s, origin obscure. OED suggests imitative; perhaps a mix of boggle and bumble, or more likely from a Scandinavian word akin to Swedish bangla "to work ineffectually," Old Swedish bunga "to strike" (cf. German Bengel "cudgel," also "rude fellow"). Related: Bungled; bungling.

n.

1650s, from bungle (v.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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