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Bond

[bond] /bɒnd/
noun
1.
Carrie (Minetta) (Carrie Jacobs-Bond) 1862–1946, U.S. songwriter and author.
2.
Julian, born 1940, U.S. civil-rights leader and politician.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for c. bond

bond

/bɒnd/
noun
1.
something that binds, fastens, or holds together, such as a chain or rope
2.
(often pl) something that brings or holds people together; tie: a bond of friendship
3.
(pl) something that restrains or imprisons; captivity or imprisonment
4.
something that governs behaviour; obligation; duty
5.
a written or spoken agreement, esp a promise: marriage bond
6.
adhesive quality or strength
7.
(finance) a certificate of debt issued in order to raise funds. It carries a fixed rate of interest and is repayable with or without security at a specified future date
8.
(law) a written acknowledgment of an obligation to pay a sum or to perform a contract
9.
(insurance, US & Canadian) a policy guaranteeing payment of a stated sum to an employer in compensation for financial losses incurred through illegal or unauthorized acts of an employee
10.
any of various arrangements of bricks or stones in a wall in which they overlap so as to provide strength
11.
12.
13.
(commerce) in bond, deposited in a bonded warehouse
verb (mainly transitive)
14.
(also intransitive) to hold or be held together, as by a rope or an adhesive; bind; connect
15.
(aeronautics) to join (metallic parts of an aircraft) together such that they are electrically interconnected
16.
to put or hold (goods) in bond
17.
(law) to place under bond
18.
(finance) to issue bonds on; mortgage
19.
to arrange (bricks, etc) in a bond
Word Origin
C13: from Old Norse band; see band²

Bond

/bɒnd/
noun
1.
Edward. born 1934, British dramatist: his plays, including Saved (1965), Lear (1971), Restoration (1981), and In the Company of Men (1990), are noted for their violent imagery and socialist commitment
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for c. bond

bond

n.

early 13c., "anything that binds," phonetic variant of band (n.1). For vowel change, see long (adj.); also influenced by Old English bonda "householder," literally "dweller" (see bondage). Legalistic sense first recorded 1590s.

v.

1670s (transitive), from bond (n.). Intransitive sense from 1836. Originally of things; of persons by 1969. Related: Bonded; bonding. Male bonding attested by 1969.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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c. bond in Medicine

bond (bŏnd)
n.
The linkage or force holding two neighboring atoms of a molecule in place and resisting their separation, usually accomplished by the transfer or sharing of one or more electrons or pairs of electrons between the atoms.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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c. bond in Science
bond
  (bŏnd)   

A force of attraction that holds atoms or ions together in a molecule or crystal. Bonds are usually created by a transfer or sharing of one or more electrons. There are single, double, and triple bonds. See also coordinate bond, covalent bond, ionic bond, metallic bond, polar bond.

The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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c. bond in Culture

bond definition


A security issued by a corporation or public body and usually carrying a fixed rate of interest and a set date, called the bond's maturity, for redemption of the principal. Like a stock, a bond is a type of investment, but unlike a stock, a bond has a definite, but not necessarily fixed, yield. Some bonds have a feature known as a call, which gives the borrower an option to pay off the principal of the bond before its maturity, the date when the bond is due to be redeemed. (See municipal bonds and Treasury bills.)

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Slang definitions & phrases for c. bond

bond

Related Terms

junk bond


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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c. bond in the Bible

an obligation of any kind (Num. 30:2, 4, 12). The word means also oppression or affliction (Ps. 116:16; Phil. 1:7). Christian love is the "bond of perfectness" (Col. 3:14), and the influences of the Spirit are the "bond of peace" (Eph. 4:3).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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