Cabareting

cabaret

[kab-uh-rey for 1–4, 6, 7; kab-uh-ret for 5]
noun
1.
a restaurant providing food, drink, music, a dance floor, and often a floor show.
2.
a café that serves food and drink and offers entertainment often of an improvisatory, satirical, and topical nature.
3.
a floor show consisting of such entertainment: The cover charge includes dinner and a cabaret.
4.
a form of theatrical entertainment, consisting mainly of political satire in the form of skits, songs, and improvisations: an actress whose credits include cabaret, TV, and dinner theater.
5.
a decoratively painted porcelain coffee or tea service with tray, produced especially in the 18th century.
6.
Archaic. a shop selling wines and liquors.
verb (used without object), cabareted [kab-uh-reyd] , cabareting [kab-uh-rey-ing] .
7.
to attend or frequent cabarets.

Origin:
1625–35; < French: tap-room, Middle French dial. (Picard or Walloon) < Middle Dutch, denasalized variant of cambret, cameret < Picard camberete small room (cognate with French chambrette; see chamber, -ette)


2. nightclub, supper club, club.
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World English Dictionary
cabaret (ˈkæbəˌreɪ)
 
n
1.  a floor show of dancing, singing, or other light entertainment at a nightclub or restaurant
2.  chiefly (US) a nightclub or restaurant providing such entertainment
 
[C17: from Norman French: tavern, probably from Late Latin camera an arched roof, chamber]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cabaret
1650s, from Fr. cabaret, lit. "tavern" (13c.), probably from M.Du. cambret, from O.Fr. (Picard dialect) camberete, dim. of cambre "chamber" (see chamber). Came to mean "a restaurant/night club" 1912; extension of meaning to "entertainment, floor show" is 1922.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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