caddy

1 [kad-ee]
noun, plural caddies.
1.
a container, rack, or other device for holding, organizing, or storing items: a pencil caddy; a bedspread caddy.
2.
Chiefly British, tea caddy.

Origin:
1785–95; see tea caddy

Dictionary.com Unabridged

caddy

2 [kad-ee]
noun, plural caddies, verb (used without object), caddied, caddying.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
caddie or caddy (ˈkædɪ)
 
n , pl -dies
1.  golf an attendant who carries clubs, etc, for a player
 
vb , -dies, -dies, -dying, -died
2.  (intr) to act as a caddie
 
[C17 (originally: a gentleman learning the military profession by serving in the army without a commission, hence C18 (Scottish): a person looking for employment, an errand-boy): from French cadet]
 
caddy or caddy
 
n
 
vb
 
[C17 (originally: a gentleman learning the military profession by serving in the army without a commission, hence C18 (Scottish): a person looking for employment, an errand-boy): from French cadet]

caddy1 (ˈkædɪ)
 
n , pl -dies
chiefly (Brit) a small container, esp for tea
 
[C18: from Malay kati; see catty²]

caddy2 (ˈkædɪ)
 
n, —vb , pl -dies, -dies, -dying, -died
a variant spelling of caddie

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

caddy
"small box for tea," 1792, from Malay kati a weight equivalent to about a pound and a third (in English from 1590s as catty), adopted as a standard mid-18c. by British companies in the East Indies. Apparently the word for a measure of tea was transferred to the chest it was carried in.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

caddy

container for tea. A corrupt form of the Malay kati, a weight of a little more than a pound (or about half a kilogram), the word was applied first to porcelain jars filled with tea and imported into England from China. Many caddies made from silver, copper, brass, pewter, and other decorative materials, such as veneers of tortoiseshell or ivory on wood, were made in the 18th century.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Maxi designed the plywood tree sculpture and plywood umbrella caddy.
Ben sold newspapers at the train station, then became a caddy at a nearby
  country club.
If there is a place for your cooking utensils in the caddy, store them there.
Maybe it was because his caddy is studying sports psychology.
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