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Denotation vs. Connotation

caldron

[kawl-druh n] /ˈkɔl drən/
noun
1.

cauldron

or caldron

[kawl-druh n] /ˈkɔl drən/
noun
1.
a large kettle or boiler.
Origin of cauldron
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English, alteration (by association with Latin caldus warm) of Middle English cauderon < Anglo-French, equivalent to caudere (< Late Latin caldāria; see caldera) + -on noun suffix
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for caldron
Historical Examples
  • The baby might be christened in Macbeth's caldron; and Harry and harlequin ought certainly to be godfathers.

    The Virginians William Makepeace Thackeray
  • It was the second view in La Masque's caldron, and but one remained to be verified.

    The Midnight Queen May Agnes Fleming
  • The soup should be stirred now and then while making, to prevent burning or sticking to the bottom of the caldron.

  • May the devil make hell-broth of ye both, in his own caldron!

  • Three wages that labourers share: the wages of a caldron, the wages of a mill, the wages of a house.

  • But over there the witches' caldron is boiling more fiercely.

  • Barnstable boiled up as a caldron of mush breaks into thick, spluttering bubbles.

    Love in a Cloud Arlo Bates
  • He found them in a dark cave, in the middle of which was a caldron boiling.

    ZigZag Journeys in Northern Lands; Hezekiah Butterworth
  • The persistent rasping noise of the sorghum mill and the bubbling of the caldron had prevented them from hearing an approach.

    The Riddle Of The Rocks Charles Egbert Craddock (AKA Mary Noailles Murfree)
  • Man and horse and mules were the only life in the naked bottom of this caldron.

    Red Men and White Owen Wister
British Dictionary definitions for caldron

caldron

/ˈkɔːldrən/
noun
1.
a variant spelling of cauldron

cauldron

/ˈkɔːldrən/
noun
1.
a large pot used for boiling, esp one with handles
Word Origin
C13: from earlier cauderon, from Anglo-French, from Latin caldārium hot bath, from calidus warm
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for caldron
n.

spelling of cauldron prefered by other dictionary editors.

cauldron

n.

c.1300, caudron, from Anglo-French caudrun, Old North French cauderon (Old French chauderon "cauldron, kettle"), from augmentative of Late Latin caldaria "cooking pot" (source of Spanish calderon, Italian calderone), from Latin calidarium "hot bath," from calidus "warm, hot" (see calorie). The -l- was inserted 15c. in imitation of Latin.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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