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candelabrum

[kan-dl-ah-bruh m, -ab-ruh m] /ˌkæn dlˈɑ brəm, -ˈæb rəm/
noun, plural candelabra
[kan-dl-ah-bruh, -ab-ruh] /ˌkæn dlˈɑ brə, -ˈæb rə/ (Show IPA),
candelabrums.
1.
an ornamental branched holder for more than one candle.
Origin
1805-1815
1805-15; < Latin candēlābrum candlestick, equivalent to candēl(a) candle + -abrum, variant (after stems with an -l-) of -bulum suffix of instruments; -ā- by analogy with deverbal derivatives
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for candelabrum
  • In each angle of the chamber is a candelabrum of highly polished red granite, from which rise jets of gas to light the apartment.
British Dictionary definitions for candelabrum

candelabrum

/ˌkændɪˈlɑːbrəm/
noun (pl) -bra (-brə), -brums, -bras
1.
a large branched candleholder or holder for overhead lights
Word Origin
C19: from Latin, from candēlacandle
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for candelabrum
candelabrum
1811, from L. candelabrum, which meant "candlestick," from candela (see candle). O.E. had candeltreow "candle-tree" in same sense. The word was borrowed earlier (late 14c.) from O.Fr. as chaundelabre with the Latin sense.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for candelabrum

in architecture, a decorative motif derived from the pedestal or shaft used to support a lamp or candle. The Romans, developing Hellenistic precedents, made candelabra of great decorative richness. Two Roman types are found. The simpler consists of a slender shaft, often fluted, supported on a spreading base of animals' feet and acanthus scrolls and carrying a flat shelf with vaselike moldings. The multitude of such candelabra found in Pompeii proves them to have been a common form of household decoration. The more monumental type, made of marble or bronze and used in public buildings, had for the base a pedestal resembling a little altar, which carried a heavy shaft frequently decorated with row on row of acanthus leaves. The lavishness of such examples was imitated in works by Renaissance artists.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Word Value for candelabrum

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