cannel coal

cannel coal

[kan-l]
noun
an oily, compact coal, burning readily and brightly.
Also called cannel.


Origin:
1530–40; cannel from candle (dial. form)

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World English Dictionary
cannel coal or cannel (ˈkænəl)
 
n
a dull coal having a high volatile content and burning with a smoky luminous flame
 
[C16: from northern English dialect cannel candle: so called from its bright flame]
 
cannel or cannel
 
n
 
[C16: from northern English dialect cannel candle: so called from its bright flame]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

cannel coal

type of hydrogen-rich, sapropelic coal characterized by a dull black, sometimes waxy lustre. It was formerly called candle coal because it lights easily and burns with a bright, smoky flame. Cannel coal consists of micrinites, macerals of the exinite group, and certain inorganic materials (see maceral). Cannel coal usually occurs at the top or bottom of other coals, though it sometimes can be found as individual seams up to 61 cm (2 feet) thick. Cannel coal was probably formed in lakes and pools where floating spores, transported by wind and water, accumulated in mud mixed with plant debris. During the 19th century cannel coal was used in the manufacture of illuminating gas and as fireplace coal.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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