Caperingly

caper

1 [key-per]
verb (used without object)
1.
to leap or skip about in a sprightly manner; prance; frisk; gambol.
noun
2.
a playful leap or skip.
3.
a prank or trick; harebrained escapade.
4.
a frivolous, carefree episode or activity.
5.
Slang. a criminal or illegal act, as a burglary or robbery.
Idioms
6.
cut a caper. cut ( def 85a ).

Origin:
1585–95; figurative use of Latin caper he-goat (cognate with Old English hæfer, Old Norse hafr, Old Irish caera sheep < a West IE term *kap-(e)ro- for a domesticated smaller animal); for the meaning, cf. dog (v.)

caperer, noun
caperingly, adverb
uncapering, adjective


3. stunt, antic, shenanigans. 4. spree, frolic.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
caper1 (ˈkeɪpə)
 
n
1.  a playful skip or leap
2.  a high-spirited escapade
3.  cut a caper, cut capers
 a.  to skip or jump playfully
 b.  to act or behave playfully; frolic
4.  slang a crime, esp an organized robbery
5.  informal (Austral) a job or occupation
6.  informal (Austral) a person's behaviour
 
vb
7.  (intr) to leap or dance about in a light-hearted manner
 
[C16: probably from capriole]
 
'caperer1
 
n
 
'caperingly1
 
adv

caper2 (ˈkeɪpə)
 
n
1.  a spiny trailing Mediterranean capparidaceous shrub, Capparis spinosa, with edible flower buds
2.  bean caper See also capers any of various similar plants or their edible parts
 
[C15: from earlier capers, capres (assumed to be plural), from Latin capparis, from Greek kapparis]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

caper
1580s, probably from It. capriolare "jump in the air" (see cab). Meaning "prank" is from 1840s; that of "crime" is from 1926. To cut capers is c.1600.

caper
1382, from L. capparis, from Gk. kapparis, of uncertain origin. The final -s was mistaken for pl. inflection in Eng. and dropped.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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