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cardoon

[kahr-doon] /kɑrˈdun/
noun
1.
a composite plant, Cynara cardunculus, of the Mediterranean area, having a root and leafstalks eaten as a vegetable.
Also, cardon
[kahr-dohn] /kɑrˈdoʊn/ (Show IPA)
.
Origin of cardoon
1605-1615
1605-15; < Middle French cardon < Old Provençal < Medieval Latin cardōn-, stem of cardō, for Latin card(u)us thistle, cardoon
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for cardon
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Brigade commander Chernov, prodded by cardon, jumped to his feet.

    Null-ABC Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire
  • cardon made a stabbing gesture with the stiletto, which he still held.

    Null-ABC Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire
  • When cardon entered and was recognized, there was a concerted movement toward him.

    Null-ABC Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire
  • "And there is also the matter of Pelton's daughter, and his son," cardon said.

    Null-ABC Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire
  • cardon pulled off the hoods and zipped open the white robes.

    Null-ABC Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire
  • Looking at it, the Literate nodded in recognition of cardon's Literacy.

    Null-ABC Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire
  • One of Pelton's traffic-control men appeared on cardon's screen.

    Null-ABC Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire
  • This Literate can be trusted; he's a friend of Mr. cardon's.

    Null-ABC Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire
  • "A couple of hundred years ago, they had something they called the Sullivan Law," cardon told him.

    Null-ABC Henry Beam Piper and John Joseph McGuire
British Dictionary definitions for cardon

cardoon

/kɑːˈduːn/
noun
1.
a thistle-like S European plant, Cynara cardunculus, closely related to the artichoke, with spiny leaves, purple flowers, and a leafstalk that may be blanched and eaten: family Asteraceae (composites)
Word Origin
C17: from French cardon, ultimately from Latin carduus thistle, artichoke
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for cardon

cardoon

n.

1610s, from French cardon, from Provençal cardon, properly "thistle," from Late latin cardonem (nominative cardo "thistle," related to Latin carduus "thistle, artichoke" (see harsh).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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