carpe diem

carpe diem

[kahr-pe dee-em; English kahr-pee dahy-uhm, kahr-pey dee-uhm]
Latin. seize the day; enjoy the present, as opposed to placing all hope in the future.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To carpe diem
Collins
World English Dictionary
carpe diem (ˈkɑːpɪ ˈdiːɛm)
 
enjoy the pleasures of the moment, without concern for the future
 
[literally: seize the day!]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

carpe diem
1817, from L., "enjoy the day," lit. "pluck the day (while it is ripe)," an aphorism from Horace ("Odes" I.xi), from PIE *kerp- "to gather, pluck, harvest."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
Carpe diem [(kahr-pe dee-em, deye-em)]

Latin for “Seize the day”: take full advantage of present opportunities. This sentiment is found not only in classical literature but in much of English literature as well (seeGather ye rosebuds while ye mayandHad we but world enough, and time, / This coyness, Lady, were no crime.”)

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

carpe diem

Enjoy the present and don't worry about the future, as in It's a beautiful day, so forget tomorrow's testcarpe diem! Latin for "seize the day," an aphorism found in the Roman writer Horace's Odes, this phrase has been used in English since the early 1800s.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

carpe diem

phrase used by the Roman poet Horace to express the idea that one should enjoy life while one can. The sentiment has been expressed in many literatures, especially in 16th- and 17th-century English poetry. Two of the best-known examples are Robert Herrick's "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time" and Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress."

Learn more about carpe diem with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;