carpet baggers

carpetbagger

[kahr-pit-bag-er]
noun
1.
U.S. History. a Northerner who went to the South after the Civil War and became active in Republican politics, especially so as to profiteer from the unsettled social and political conditions of the area during Reconstruction.
2.
any opportunistic or exploitive outsider: Our bus company has served this town for years, but now the new one run by carpetbaggers from the city is stealing our business.

Origin:
1865–70, Americanism; carpetbag + -er1; so called because they came South carrying their belongings in carpetbags

carpetbaggery, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
carpetbagger (ˈkɑːpɪtˌbæɡə)
 
n
1.  a politician who seeks public office in a locality where he has no real connections
2.  (Brit) a person who makes a short-term investment in a mutual savings or life-assurance organization in order to benefit from free shares issued following the organization's conversion to a public limited company
3.  (US) a Northern White who went to the South after the Civil War to profit from Reconstruction

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

carpetbagger
1868, Amer.Eng., scornful appellation for Northerners who went South after the fall of the CSA seeking private gain or political advancement. The name is based on the image of men arriving with all their worldly goods in a big carpetbag (1830), a soft-cover traveling case made of carpet fabric. Sense
extended to any opportunist from out of the area
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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