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carriage

[kar-ij; for 9 also kar-ee-ij] /ˈkær ɪdʒ; for 9 also ˈkær i ɪdʒ/
noun
1.
a wheeled vehicle for conveying persons, as one drawn by horses and designed for comfort and elegance.
3.
British. a railway passenger coach.
4.
a wheeled support, as for a cannon.
5.
a movable part, as of a machine, designed for carrying something.
6.
manner of carrying the head and body; bearing:
the carriage of a soldier.
7.
Also called carriage piece, horse. an inclined beam, as a string, supporting the steps of a stair.
8.
the act of transporting; conveyance:
the expenses of carriage.
9.
the price or cost of transportation.
10.
(in a typewriter) the moving part carrying the platen and its associated parts, usually set in motion to carry the paper across the point where the print element or type bars strike.
11.
management; administration.
Origin
1150-1200
1150-1200; Middle English cariage < Anglo-French, Old North French, equivalent to cari(er) to carry + -age -age
Synonyms
1. cart, car, wagon. 6. mien, comportment, demeanor, air.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for carriage
  • The arrival of the horseless carriage was welcomed on many counts.
  • It would seem that putting a robot onto a bike would be a pointless exercise akin to putting gas-powered horses before a carriage.
  • But one reason the horseless carriage appeared was because of the liabilities of the horse.
  • The subject of the study is challenged with thought experiments involving a runaway railway trolley or train carriage.
  • It was a horse carriage modified with two electric motors running the chain drive that moved the rear wheels.
  • Since it is a long walk you can ether take a carriage ride or a donkey, or horse, or walk on foot.
  • The legend is that the first car race happened the first time one horseless carriage met another on the road.
  • There is reason to believe that the pedicab ban may be driven by resentment from horse-drawn carriage owners.
  • On entering a railway carriage be sure to shake hands with all those present.
  • He didn't want to spend money adding a rack rail, so he experimented with a smooth-wheeled test carriage on smooth-wheeled rails.
British Dictionary definitions for carriage

carriage

/ˈkærɪdʒ/
noun
1.
(Brit) a railway coach for passengers
2.
the manner in which a person holds and moves his head and body; bearing
3.
a four-wheeled horse-drawn vehicle for persons
4.
the moving part of a machine that bears another part: a typewriter carriage, a lathe carriage
5.
(ˈkærɪdʒ; ˈkærɪɪdʒ)
  1. the act of conveying; carrying
  2. the charge made for conveying (esp in the phrases carriage forward, when the charge is to be paid by the receiver, and carriage paid)
Word Origin
C14: from Old Northern French cariage, from carier to carry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for carriage
n.

late 14c., "act of carrying, means of conveyance; wheeled vehicles collectively," from Anglo-French and Old North French cariage "cart, carriage, action of transporting in a vehicle" (Old French charriage, Modern French charriage), from carier "to carry" (see carry (v.)). Meaning "individual wheeled vehicle" is c.1400; specific sense of "horse-drawn, wheeled vehicle for hauling people" first attested 1706; extended to railway cars by 1830. Meaning "way of carrying one's body" is 1590s. Carriage-house attested from 1761.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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carriage in the Bible

In the Authorized Version this word is found as the rendering of many different words. In Judg. 18:21 it means valuables, wealth, or booty. In Isa. 46:1 (R.V., "the things that ye carried about") the word means a load for a beast of burden. In 1 Sam. 17:22 and Isa. 10:28 it is the rendering of a word ("stuff" in 1 Sam. 10:22) meaning implements, equipments, baggage. The phrase in Acts 21:15, "We took up our carriages," means properly, "We packed up our baggage," as in the Revised Version.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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11
13
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