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carrion

[kar-ee-uh n] /ˈkær i ən/
noun
1.
dead and putrefying flesh.
2.
rottenness; anything vile.
adjective
3.
feeding on carrion.
Origin
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English caroyne, careyn, carion < Anglo-French careine, Old French charo(i)gne < Vulgar Latin *caronia, equivalent to Latin carun- (see caruncle) + -ia -y3
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for carrion
  • Some cultures have long believed the high-flying carrion birds transported the flesh of the dead up to the heavens.
  • The idea is that a wolverine will be drawn to the fragrant carrion and climb out on the pole.
  • Crews then trek through remote canyons to check on the sick or dead condor and run tests on it and the carrion it was eating.
  • It is interesting to see how populations and behavior of carrion-eating species change in response to this new food source.
  • Ravens, fellow carrion-eating raptors, are big as wild turkeys.
  • It's not full out creepy but it's not exactly respected: the lurking about hunting for nonferrous carrion.
  • Many cultures shun dog food: dogs are scavengers and carrion-feeders.
  • In the past, that meant eating carrion from sheep and pigs, but ranching no longer takes place on the island.
  • Something had to come along and take advantage of all that carrion.
  • Eating carrion makes me gag, but that is exactly what meat-eaters do.
British Dictionary definitions for carrion

carrion

/ˈkærɪən/
noun
1.
dead and rotting flesh
2.
(modifier) eating carrion: carrion beetles
3.
something rotten or repulsive
Word Origin
C13: from Anglo-French caroine, ultimately from Latin carō flesh
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for carrion
n.

early 13c., carione, from Anglo-French carogne (Old North French caroigne; Old French charogne, 12c., "carrion, corpse," Modern French charogne), from Vulgar Latin *caronia "carcass" (source of Italian carogna, Spanish carroña "carrion"), from Latin caro "meat" (see carnage).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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