CASSIA PULP

cassia

[kash-uh, kas-ee-uh]
noun
1.
Also called cassia bark, Chinese cinnamon. a variety of cinnamon derived from the cassia-bark tree.
2.
any of numerous plants, trees, and shrubs belonging to the genus Cassia, of the legume family, several species of which yield medicinal products.
3.
Also called cassia pods. the pods of Cassia fistulosa, a tree widely cultivated as an ornamental.
4.
Also called cassia pulp. the pulp of these pods, used medicinally and as a flavoring.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English cas(s)ia, Old English < Latin < Greek kas(s)ía < Semitic; compare Hebrew qəṣīʿāh

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
cassia (ˈkæsɪə)
 
n
1.  See also senna any plant of the mainly tropical leguminous genus Cassia, esp C. fistula, whose pods yield cassia pulp, a mild laxative
2.  a lauraceous tree, Cinnamomum cassia, of tropical Asia
3.  cassia bark the cinnamon-like bark of this tree, used as a spice
 
[Old English, from Latin casia, from Greek kasia, of Semitic origin; related to Hebrew qesī `āh cassia]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cassia
cinnamon-like plant, late O.E., from L. cassia, from Gk. kasia, from Heb. q'tsi-ah, from qatsa "to cut off, strip off bark."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Cassia definition


(1.) Hebrew _kiddah'_, i.e., "split." One of the principal spices of the holy anointing oil (Ex. 30:24), and an article of commerce (Ezek. 27:19). It is the inner bark of a tree resembling the cinnamon (q.v.), the Cinnamomum cassia of botanists, and was probably imported from India. (2.) Hebrew pl. _ketzi'oth_ (Ps. 45:8). Mentioned in connection with myrrh and aloes as being used to scent garments. It was probably prepared from the peeled bark, as the Hebrew word suggests, of some kind of cinnamon.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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