catapult

[kat-uh-puhlt, -poolt]
noun
1.
an ancient military engine for hurling stones, arrows, etc.
2.
a device for launching an airplane from the deck of a ship.
3.
British. a slingshot.
verb (used with object)
4.
to hurl from a catapult.
5.
to thrust or move quickly or suddenly: His brilliant performance in the play catapulted him to stardom.
6.
British.
a.
to hurl (a missile) from a slingshot.
b.
to hit (an object) with a missile from a slingshot.
verb (used without object)
7.
to be catapulted.
8.
to move or spring up suddenly, quickly, or forcibly, as if by means of a catapult: The car catapulted down the highway. When he heard the alarm he catapulted out of bed.

Origin:
1570–80; < Latin catapulta < Greek katapéltēs, equivalent to kata- cata- + péltēs hurler, akin to pállein to hurl

catapultic, adjective


5. throw, fling, propel, pitch, shoot.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
catapult (ˈkætəˌpʌlt)
 
n
1.  US and Canadian name: slingshot a Y-shaped implement with a loop of elastic fastened to the ends of the two prongs, used mainly by children for shooting small stones, etc
2.  a heavy war engine used formerly for hurling stones, etc
3.  a device installed in warships to launch aircraft
 
vb (foll by over, into, etc)
4.  (tr) to shoot forth from or as if from a catapult
5.  to move precipitately: she was catapulted to stardom overnight
 
[C16: from Latin catapulta, from Greek katapeltēs, from kata- down + pallein to hurl]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

catapult
1577, from L. catapulta "war machine for throwing," from Gk. katapeltes, from kata "against" + base of pallein "to toss, hurl." The verb is first recorded 1848.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
His sailors catapulted pots full of venomous snakes onto the decks of the
  opposing fleet.
Everybody on board would be catapulted from one side of the ship to the other,
  and the car straps could snap.
It was recall which may have catapulted humans outside natural selection
  pathways.
All were catapulted into modernity by a gusher of oil, and left scrambling to
  find a way to manage their sudden riches.
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