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cater

[key-ter] /ˈkeɪ tər/
verb (used without object)
1.
to provide food, service, etc., as for a party or wedding:
to cater for a banquet.
2.
to provide or supply what amuses, is desired, or gives pleasure, comfort, etc. (usually followed by to or for):
to cater to popular demand; to cater to an invalid.
verb (used with object)
3.
to provide food and service for:
to cater a party.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; v. use of obsolete cater, Middle English catour, aphetic variant of acatour buyer < Anglo-French, equivalent to acat(er) to buy (see cate) + -our -or2
Related forms
cateringly, adverb
uncatered, adjective
uncatering, adjective
Synonyms
2. humor, indulge, please.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for catering
  • These book companies are selling out to the rest of the country by catering to them.
  • We were planning on catering the event and had no idea of a headcount.
  • You've reserved the space, maybe requested special media equipment, and perhaps you've arranged for some catering.
  • catering to their every whim and desire because they are giving this feedback is a whole other thing.
  • It's my understanding that many of those meeting ninja tricks involve catering.
  • His owners are either retired or work in construction, catering, or retail.
  • Vast network of small, local establishments catering to tourists.
  • The owners, who operate a popular downtown catering business, seem determined to make vegetables fun.
  • Nickelodeon recently decided to start catering to adults.
  • Its catering trucks rise two stories off the ground to reach the galleys.
British Dictionary definitions for catering

catering

/ˈkeɪtərɪŋ/
noun
1.
the trade of a professional caterer
2.
the food, etc, provided at a function by a caterer

cater

/ˈkeɪtə/
verb
1.
(intransitive; foll by for or to) to provide what is required or desired (for): to cater for a need, cater to your tastes
2.
when intr, foll by for. to provide food, services, etc (for): we cater for parties, to cater a banquet
Word Origin
C16: from earlier catour purchaser, variant of acatour, from Anglo-Norman acater to buy, ultimately related to Latin acceptāre to accept
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for catering

cater

v.

"provide food for," c.1600, from Middle English catour (n.) "buyer of provisions" (c.1400; late 13c. as a surname), a shortening of Anglo-French achatour "buyer" (Old North French acatour, Old French achatour, 13c., Modern French acheteur), from Old French achater "to buy," originally "to buy provisions," perhaps from Vulgar Latin *accaptare, from Latin ad- "to" + captare "to take, hold," frequentative of capere "to take" (see capable).

Or else from Vulgar Latin *accapitare "to add to one's capital," with second element from verbal stem of Latin caput (genitive capitis); see capital (adj.). Figuratively from 1650s. Related: Catered; catering.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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