cathedrae

cathedra

[kuh-thee-druh, kath-i-]
noun, plural cathedrae [kuh-thee-dree, kath-i-dree] .
1.
the seat or throne of a bishop in the principal church of a diocese.
2.
an official chair, as of a professor in a university.
3.
an ancient Roman chair used by women, having an inclined, curved back and curved legs flaring outward: the Roman copy of the Greek klismos.

Origin:
1625–35; < Latin < Greek kathédra, derivative of kathézomai to sit down; see cata-, sit; cf. chair

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World English Dictionary
cathedra (kəˈθiːdrə)
 
n
1.  a bishop's throne
2.  the office or rank of a bishop
3.  See ex cathedra
 
[from Latin: chair]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

cathedra
"seat of a bishop in his church," 1829, from L. cathedra (see cathedral).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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