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cause-and-effect

[kawz-uh nd-i-fekt, -uh n-] /ˈkɔz ənd ɪˈfɛkt, -ən-/
adjective
1.
noting a relationship between actions or events such that one or more are the result of the other or others.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for cause and effect
  • To begin, let me acknowledge that one can't draw firm conclusions about cause and effect after a short visit.
  • It's untenable but logic in terms of cause and effect are beyond this crowd.
  • Moreover, they change so slowly that cause and effect are not always clear.
  • Nature's interdependent chains of cause and effect are usually too complex to disentangle.
  • It is simply a reversal of cause and effect: life, through evolution, is finely tuned to the environment it is found in.
  • If you are a scientist, you know that cause and effect rule the universe, not gods.
  • Understanding the relation between cause and effect is a key part of attempts to construct a unified theory of physics.
  • Whether it is natural or not scientists can determine those cause and effect relationships.
  • However, there seems to be some confusion of cause and effect here.
  • Without addressing cause and effect, this article indicates that visual input may have caused the profound changes.
Contemporary definitions for cause and effect
noun

the concept that concept that an action or event will produce a certain response to the action in the form of another event; also written cause-effect , cause/effect

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Quotes with cause and effect