caveat-emptor

caveat emptor

[kav-ee-aht emp-tawr, -at, kah-vee-, key-; Latin kah-we-aht emp-tohr]
noun
let the buyer beware: the principle that the seller of a product cannot be held responsible for its quality unless it is guaranteed in a warranty.

Origin:
1515–25; < Latin

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Collins
World English Dictionary
caveat emptor (ˈɛmptɔː)
 
n
the principle that the buyer must bear the risk for the quality of goods purchased unless they are covered by the seller's warranty
 
[Latin: let the buyer beware]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

caveat emptor
1523, "let the buyer beware; see caveat.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
Caveat emptor [(kav-ee-aht, kah-vee-aht emp-tawr)]

Latin for “Let the buyer beware.” It means that a customer should be cautious and alert to the possibility of being cheated: “Caveat emptor is the first rule of buying a used car.”

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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