chalumeau

chalumeau

[shal-yuh-moh; French sha-ly-moh]
noun, plural chalumeaux [shal-yuh-mohz; French sha-ly-moh] .
1.
Music. the low register of the clarinet.
2.
a 17th- or 18th-century woodwind instrument.

Origin:
1705–15; < French: orig., flute made from a reed, stem of a reed; Old French chalemel < Late Latin calamellus narrow reed; see calamus, -elle

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Encyclopedia Britannica
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chalumeau

single-reed wind instrument, forerunner of the clarinet. Chalumeau referred to various folk reed pipes and bagpipes, especially reed pipes of cylindrical bore sounded by a single reed, which was either tied on or cut in the pipe wall. Soon after this type of chalumeau became fashionable in urban society, about 1700, Johann Christoph Denner of Nurnberg added an extra finger hole and two keys; his further experimentation led to the clarinet.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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