charmless

charm

1 [chahrm]
noun
1.
a power of pleasing or attracting, as through personality or beauty: charm of manner; the charm of a mountain lake.
2.
a trait or feature imparting this power.
3.
4.
a trinket to be worn on a bracelet, necklace, etc.
5.
something worn or carried on one's person for its supposed magical effect; amulet.
6.
any action supposed to have magical power.
7.
the chanting or recitation of a magic verse or formula.
8.
a verse or formula credited with magical power.
9.
Physics. a quantum number assigned the value +1 for one kind of quark, −1 for its antiquark, and 0 for all other quarks. Symbol: C Compare charmed quark.
verb (used with object)
10.
to delight or please greatly by beauty, attractiveness, etc.; enchant: She charmed us with her grace.
11.
to act upon (someone or something) with or as with a compelling or magical force: to charm a bird from a tree.
12.
to endow with or protect by supernatural powers.
13.
to gain or influence through personal charm: He charmed a raise out of his boss.
verb (used without object)
14.
to be fascinating or pleasing.
15.
to use charms.
16.
to act as a charm.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English charme < Old French < Latin carminem, accusative of carmen song, magical formula < *canmen (by dissimilation), equivalent to can(ere) to sing + -men noun suffix

charmedly [chahr-mid-lee] , adverb
charmer, noun
charmless, adjective
charmlessly, adverb


1. attractiveness, allurement. 4. bauble. 5. talisman. 6. enchantment, spell. 8. spell. 10. fascinate, captivate, entrance, enrapture, ravish; allure, bewitch.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
charm1 (tʃɑːm)
 
n
1.  the quality of pleasing, fascinating, or attracting people
2.  a pleasing or attractive feature
3.  a small object worn or kept for supposed magical powers of protection; amulet; talisman
4.  a trinket worn on a bracelet
5.  a magic spell; enchantment
6.  a formula or action used in casting such a spell
7.  physics an internal quantum number of certain elementary particles, used to explain some scattering experiments
8.  like a charm perfectly; successfully
 
vb
9.  to attract or fascinate; delight greatly
10.  to cast a magic spell on
11.  to protect, influence, or heal, supposedly by magic
12.  (tr) to influence or obtain by personal charm: he charmed them into believing him
 
[C13: from Old French charme, from Latin carmen song, incantation, from canere to sing]

charm2 (tʃɑːm)
 
n
dialect (Southwest English) a loud noise, as of a number of people chattering or of birds singing
 
[C16: variant of chirm]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

charm
c.1300, from O.Fr. charme "incantation," from L. carmen "song, verse, enchantment," from canere "to sing" (see chant), with dissimilation of -n- to -r- before -m-. The notion is of chanting or reciting verses of magical power. Sense of "pleasing quality" first recorded 1598.
Meaning "small trinket fastened to a watch-chain, etc." first recorded 1865.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
charm   (chärm)  Pronunciation Key 
  1. One of the flavors of quarks, contributing to the charm number—a quantum number—for hadrons.

  2. A charmed particle is a particle that contains at least one charmed quark or charmed antiquark. The charmed quark was hypothesized to account for the longevity of the J/psi particle and to explain differences in the behavior of leptons and hadrons. See more at flavor.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Abbreviations & Acronyms
CHARM
Coupled Hydrosphere—Atmosphere Research Model
The American Heritage® Abbreviations Dictionary, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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