chew the scenery

scenery

[see-nuh-ree]
noun, plural sceneries.
1.
the general appearance of a place; the aggregate of features that give character to a landscape.
2.
hangings, draperies, structures, etc., used on a stage to represent a locale or furnish decorative background.
Idioms
3.
chew the scenery, to act melodramatically; overact.

Origin:
1740–50; scene + -ery


1. terrain, view, surroundings.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
scenery (ˈsiːnərɪ)
 
n , pl -eries
1.  the natural features of a landscape
2.  theatre the painted backcloths, stage structures, etc, used to represent a location in a theatre or studio
 
[C18: from Italian scenario]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Word Origin & History

scenery
"decoration of a theater stage," 1774, earlier scenary (1690s), from scene (q.v.) + -ery. Meaning "a landscape or view, a pictorial scene" is from 1777.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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