chloramphenicol

Use Chloramphenicol in a sentence

chloramphenicol

[klawr-am-fen-i-kawl, -kol, klohr-]
noun Pharmacology.
a colorless, crystalline, slightly water-soluble antibiotic, C 11 H 12 Cl 2 N 2 O 5 , obtained from cultures of Streptomyces venezuelae or synthesized: used chiefly in the treatment of infections caused by certain bacteria, by rickettsiae, and by certain viruses.

Origin:
1945–50; chlor-2 + am(ido)- + phe(n)- + ni(tr)- + (gly)col

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Collins
World English Dictionary
chloramphenicol (ˌklɔːræmˈfɛnɪˌkɒl)
 
n
a broad-spectrum antibiotic used esp in treating typhoid fever and rickettsial infections: obtained from the bacterium Streptomyces venezuelae or synthesized. Formula: C11H12N2O5Cl2
 
[C20: from chloro- + am(ido)- + phe(no)- + ni(tro)- + (gly)col]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

chloramphenicol chlor·am·phen·i·col (klôr'ām-fěn'ĭ-kôl', -kōl')
n.
A broad-spectrum oral antibiotic derived from the soil bacterium Streptomyces venezuelae or produced synthetically.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
chloramphenicol   (klôr'ām-fěn'ĭ-kôl', -kōl')  Pronunciation Key 
An antibiotic derived from the soil bacterium Streptomyces venezuelae or produced synthetically, and effective against a broad spectrum of microorganisms. Chemical formula: C11H12Cl2N2O5.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

chloramphenicol

antibiotic drug once commonly used in the treatment of infections caused by various bacteria, including those in the genera Rickettsia and Mycoplasma. Chloramphenicol was originally found as a product of the metabolism of the soil bacterium Streptomyces venezuelae (order Actinomycetales) and is now synthesized chemically. It achieves its antibacterial effect by interfering with protein synthesis in these microorganisms. The drug is seldom used, because of its potential toxicity and the availability of safer drugs.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
There is no known level at which chloramphenicol is safe.
If the antibiotic is not working and the health care provider suspects antibiotic resistance, chloramphenicol may be used.
The acetylation prevents chloramphenicol from binding to the ribosome.
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