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chock-full

[chok-foo l, chuhk-] /ˈtʃɒkˈfʊl, ˈtʃʌk-/
adjective
1.
full to the limit; crammed.
Also, chock-ful, chuck-full, choke-full.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English chokke-fulle, equivalent to chokke (< ?) + fulle full1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for chockfull

chock-full

adjective
1.
(postpositive) completely full
Word Origin
C17 choke-full; see choke, full
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for chockfull

chock-full

adj.

c.1400, chokkeful "crammed full," possibly from choke "cheek" (see cheek (n.)). Or it may be from Old French choquier "collide, crash, hit" (13c., Modern French choquer), which is probably from Germanic (cf. Middle Dutch schokken; see shock (n.1)).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for chockfull

chock-full

adjective

Absolutely full; crammed; chockablock

[perhaps 1400+, certainly 1751+; origin uncertain; perhaps ''full to the point of choking'']


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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