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choreograph

[kawr-ee-uh-graf, -grahf, kohr-] /ˈkɔr i əˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf, ˈkoʊr-/
verb (used with object)
1.
to provide the choreography for:
to choreograph a musical comedy.
2.
to manage, maneuver, or direct:
The author is a genius at choreographing a large cast of characters.
verb (used without object)
3.
to work as a choreographer.
Origin
1875-1880
1875-80; back formation from choreography
Related forms
rechoreograph, verb (used with object)
unchoreographed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for choreograph
  • Tiny structures in the feathers choreograph incoming light, reflecting sapphire in one direction, emerald in another.
  • People can design and choreograph their own routines.
  • He was now an internationally respected choreographer, but he had little opportunity to choreograph.
  • It is all in an effort to choreograph a predictable level of control.
  • He needed roles that would extend his gifts, and above all, he needed to choreograph.
  • Students learn elements of creative dance and then choreograph those elements into a performance that relates to their curriculum.
  • Have students perform and choreograph their creations.
  • There's footbag freestyle, where players choreograph routines to music.
  • When speech by a public employee is involved, courts typically choreograph a three-step chaconne.
  • Children will choreograph their own dances, which will allow the students an opportunity to develop creativity.
British Dictionary definitions for choreograph

choreograph

/ˈkɒrɪəˌɡræf/
verb
1.
(transitive) to compose the steps and dances for (a piece of music or ballet)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for choreograph
v.

1943, American English, back-formation from choreography, or else from French choréographier (1827). Figurative sense from c.1965. Related: choreographed.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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