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chortle

[chawr-tl] /ˈtʃɔr tl/
verb (used without object), chortled, chortling.
1.
to chuckle gleefully.
verb (used with object), chortled, chortling.
2.
to express with a gleeful chuckle:
to chortle one's joy.
noun
3.
a gleeful chuckle.
Origin of chortle
blend of chuckle and snort; coined by Lewis Carroll in Through the Looking-Glass (1871)
Related forms
chortler, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for chortled
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I stuck him with the fork,” he chortled, “and he squealed like a pig!

    The Day of Wrath Louis Tracy
  • The druggist danced and chortled till the bottles danced on the shelves.

  • "Now, I don't want to wake up," he chortled, as he hefted the various sacks.

    Smoke Bellew Jack London
  • And even Noel "chortled in his joy," to use his favourite expression.

    Mollie's Prince Rosa Nouchette Carey
  • "We gave them a licking they won't forget so quickly," Pepe chortled.

    The Five Arrows Allan Chase
  • "I fetched 'em from town Tuesday morning," chortled Furneaux.

  • "He'll die when the freight claims come in," Mr. McGuffey chortled.

    Captain Scraggs Peter B. Kyne
  • "You'll give it to the police, all right," chortled Mr. Smedburg.

    The Red Cross Girl Richard Harding Davis
  • "Very tricky, these Appsalanoj," he chortled and attacked the solder with a knife blade.

    The Ethical Engineer Henry Maxwell Dempsey
British Dictionary definitions for chortled

chortle

/ˈtʃɔːtəl/
verb
1.
(intransitive) to chuckle gleefully
noun
2.
a gleeful chuckle
Derived Forms
chortler, noun
Word Origin
C19: coined (1871) by Lewis Carroll in Through the Looking-glass; probably a blend of chuckle + snort
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for chortled

chortle

v.

coined 1872 by Lewis Carroll in "Through the Looking Glass," perhaps from chuckle and snort. Related: Chortled; chortling. As a noun, from 1903.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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