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chortle

[chawr-tl] /ˈtʃɔr tl/
verb (used without object), chortled, chortling.
1.
to chuckle gleefully.
verb (used with object), chortled, chortling.
2.
to express with a gleeful chuckle:
to chortle one's joy.
noun
3.
a gleeful chuckle.
Origin
blend of chuckle and snort; coined by Lewis Carroll in Through the Looking-Glass (1871)
Related forms
chortler, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for chortling
  • Even the act of chortling itself seems to improve memory.
  • The chortling chorus and trumpeting fanfares from the unseen heavenly hosts were a little unnerving, but in a tantalizing way.
  • Often he'd be having so much fun that he'd start squeaking and chortling, and he couldn't complete the thought.
  • Perhaps these are media-driven frenzies, no more real than the canned laughter chortling from our television screens.
British Dictionary definitions for chortling

chortle

/ˈtʃɔːtəl/
verb
1.
(intransitive) to chuckle gleefully
noun
2.
a gleeful chuckle
Derived Forms
chortler, noun
Word Origin
C19: coined (1871) by Lewis Carroll in Through the Looking-glass; probably a blend of chuckle + snort
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for chortling

chortle

v.

coined 1872 by Lewis Carroll in "Through the Looking Glass," perhaps from chuckle and snort. Related: Chortled; chortling. As a noun, from 1903.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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