cicada

[si-key-duh, -kah-]
noun, plural cicadas, cicadae [si-key-dee, -kah-] .
any large homopterous insect of the family Cicadidae, the male of which produces a shrill sound by means of vibrating membranes on the underside of the abdomen.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin cicāda

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To cicadas
Collins
World English Dictionary
cicada or cicala (sɪˈkɑːdə)
 
n , pl -das, -dae, -las, -le
any large broad insect of the homopterous family Cicadidae, most common in warm regions. Cicadas have membranous wings and the males produce a high-pitched drone by vibration of a pair of drumlike abdominal organs
 
[C19: from Latin]
 
cicala or cicala (sɪˈkɑːdə, -diː, -leɪ)
 
n
 
[C19: from Latin]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cicada
early 15c., from L., lit. "tree cricket."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Cicadas pop sound boxes on their abdomen and make a noise as loud as a jet
  engine.
Cicadas are appearing in a variety of foods, including ice cream and cookies.
Visitors can wander through dewy tea plantations and bamboo forests, or swim in
  a reservoir to the buzz of cicadas.
Now billions of cicadas are coming out for a final, noisy farewell.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature