cinder

[sin-der]
noun
1.
a partially or mostly burned piece of coal, wood, etc.
2.
cinders.
a.
any residue of combustion; ashes.
b.
Geology. coarse scoriae erupted by volcanoes.
3.
a live, flameless coal; ember.
4.
Metallurgy.
a.
slag ( def 1 ).
b.
a mixture of ashes and slag.
verb (used with object)
5.
to spread cinders on: The highway department salted and cindered the icy roads.
6.
Archaic. to reduce to cinders.
verb (used without object)
7.
to spread cinders on a surface, as a road or sidewalk: My neighbor began cindering as soon as the first snowflake fell.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English synder, Old English sinder slag; cognate with German Sinter, Old Norse sindr; c- (for s-) < French cendre ashes

cindery, cinderous, adjective
cinderlike, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
cinder (ˈsɪndə)
 
n
1.  a piece of incombustible material left after the combustion of coal, coke, etc; clinker
2.  a piece of charred material that burns without flames; ember
3.  Also called: sinter any solid waste from smelting or refining
4.  (plural) fragments of volcanic lava; scoriae
 
vb
5.  rare (tr) to burn to cinders
 
[Old English sinder; related to Old Norse sindr, Old High German sintar, Old Slavonic sedra stalactite]
 
'cindery
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cinder
O.E. sinder "dross of iron, slag," from P.Gmc. *sindran, from PIE base *sendhro- "coagulating fluid." Initial s- changed to c- under infl. of Fr. cendre. Volcanic cinder cone is recorded from 1849.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
There is so much of these elements in coal that cinders and coal smoke are actually valuable ores.
Their cold-war rivalry could have incinerated the planet and made the cinders
  bounce.
In the forge's dust and cinders, in the tissues of the loom.
Sometimes cinders blew in our faces, and the thick tumbling part of the
  blackness was smoke.
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