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citizenry

[sit-uh-zuh n-ree, -suh n-] /ˈsɪt ə zən ri, -sən-/
noun, plural citizenries.
1.
citizens collectively.
Origin
1810-1820
1810-20; citizen + -ry
Related forms
undercitizenry, noun, plural undercitizenries.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for citizenry
  • Their wealth presents a culture shock to the citizenry.
  • The government subsidizes education on all levels because it is perceived that an educated citizenry is a better citizenry.
  • Smaller generators will protect the citizenry from the corrupting power of big business.
  • The citizenry has long since lost to the corporate elite, backed by the judiciary who find the means to justify their bidding.
  • Old labels no longer fit, and the citizenry seems torn between competing desires for saviors and scapegoats.
  • The government needs a central information infrastructure that both government and citizenry can access.
  • When science policy issues arise among the citizenry, the scientists don't really play a role.
  • The question is one of the citizenry versus the corporations.
  • It is my right to refuse coercive activity by the government and the citizenry.
  • However, a better informed citizenry is a more effective and responsible citizenry.
British Dictionary definitions for citizenry

citizenry

/ˈsɪtɪzənrɪ/
noun (pl) -ries
1.
citizens collectively
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for citizenry
n.

"citizens collectively," 1795, from citizen + -ry.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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