clamorous

[klam-er-uhs]
adjective
1.
full of, marked by, or of the nature of clamor.
2.
vigorous in demands or complaints.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English. See clamor1, -ous

clamorously, adverb
clamorousness, noun
nonclamorous, adjective
nonclamorously, adverb
unclamorous, adjective
unclamorously, adverb
unclamorousness, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
clamour or clamor (ˈklæmə)
 
n
1.  a loud persistent outcry, as from a large number of people
2.  a vehement expression of collective feeling or outrage: a clamour against higher prices
3.  a loud and persistent noise: the clamour of traffic
 
vb
4.  (intr; often foll by for or against) to make a loud noise or outcry; make a public demand: they clamoured for attention
5.  (tr) to move, influence, or force by outcry: the people clamoured him out of office
 
[C14: from Old French clamour, from Latin clāmor, from clāmāre to cry out]
 
clamor or clamor
 
n
 
vb
 
[C14: from Old French clamour, from Latin clāmor, from clāmāre to cry out]
 
'clamourer or clamor
 
n
 
'clamorer or clamor
 
n
 
'clamorous or clamor
 
adj
 
'clamorously or clamor
 
adv
 
'clamorousness or clamor
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Example sentences
They are a big reason people forsake the city's clamorous pleasures.
Clamorous public events and private individual actions, equally, are muffled by
  memory.
She's less poignant or tragic than merely clamorous and bothersome.
To judge from the clamorous audience reaction, dance will be back at the
  festival.
Synonyms
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