clatterer

clatter

[klat-er]
verb (used without object)
1.
to make a loud, rattling sound, as that produced by hard objects striking rapidly one against the other: The shutters clattered in the wind.
2.
to move rapidly with such a sound: The iron-wheeled cart clattered down the street.
3.
to talk fast and noisily; chatter: They clattered on and on about their children.
verb (used with object)
4.
to cause to clatter: clattering the pots and pans in the sink.
noun
5.
a rattling noise or series of rattling noises: The stagecoach made a terrible clatter going over the wooden bridge.
6.
noisy disturbance; din; racket.
7.
noisy talk; din of voices: They had to shout over the clatter at the cocktail party.
8.
idle talk; gossip.

Origin:
before 1050; Middle English clateren, Old English clatr- (in clatrunge); cognate with Dutch klateren to rattle; see -er6

clatterer, noun
clatteringly, adverb
clattery, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
clatter (ˈklætə)
 
vb
1.  to make or cause to make a rattling noise, esp as a result of movement
2.  (intr) to chatter
 
n
3.  a rattling sound or noise
4.  a noisy commotion, such as one caused by loud chatter
 
[Old English clatrung clattering (gerund); related to Dutch klateren to rattle, German klatschen to smack, Norwegian klattra to knock]
 
'clatterer
 
n
 
'clatteringly
 
adv
 
'clattery
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

clatter
late O.E., probably from O.E. *clatrian, imitative, perhaps from PIE base *gal- "to cry out" (see call).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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