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cloistered

[kloi-sterd] /ˈklɔɪ stərd/
adjective
1.
secluded from the world; sheltered:
a cloistered life.
2.
having a cloister or cloisters.
Origin
1575-1585
1575-85; cloister + -ed2
Related forms
noncloistered, adjective
uncloistered, adjective
well-cloistered, adjective
Synonyms
1. withdrawn, isolated, aloof, sequestered.

cloister

[kloi-ster] /ˈklɔɪ stər/
noun
1.
a covered walk, especially in a religious institution, having an open arcade or colonnade usually opening onto a courtyard.
2.
a courtyard, especially in a religious institution, bordered with such walks.
3.
a place of religious seclusion, as a monastery or convent.
4.
any quiet, secluded place.
5.
life in a monastery or convent.
verb (used with object)
6.
to confine in a monastery or convent.
7.
to confine in retirement; seclude.
8.
to furnish with a cloister or covered walk.
9.
to convert into a monastery or convent.
Origin
1250-1300; Middle English cloistre < Anglo-French, Old French, blend of cloison partition (see cloisonné) and clostre (< Latin claustrum barrier (Late Latin: enclosed place); see claustrum)
Related forms
cloisterless, adjective
cloisterlike, adjective
Synonyms
3. abbey, priory.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for cloistered
  • Remaining cloistered and unaware was an intellectual advantage.
  • Large doses of them still stay that way, cloistered and clustered.
  • On one wall, monks fight with feet and clenched fists in a cloistered garden.
  • He also benefited from all the culture and diversity that were missing from my cloistered suburban upbringing.
  • Cathy rebels against this cloistered existence and runs off to work in a house of ill repute.
  • Members of my clan sometimes were overly cloistered.
  • The house of fellow nondrinkers provides a safe haven of sorts, but it is hardly designed to be a cloistered existence.
  • It was a cloistered, scholarly town of a few hundred thousand.
  • Once they become cloistered in refuges, animals and plants often become increasingly distinct from even their close relatives.
  • One can easily imagine cloistered communities focused on sustainable, ecological practices.
British Dictionary definitions for cloistered

cloister

/ˈklɔɪstə/
noun
1.
a covered walk, usually around a quadrangle in a religious institution, having an open arcade or colonnade on the inside and a wall on the outside
2.
(sometimes pl) a place of religious seclusion, such as a monastery
3.
life in a monastery or convent
verb
4.
(transitive) to confine or seclude in or as if in a monastery
Derived Forms
cloister-like, adjective
Word Origin
C13: from Old French cloistre, from Medieval Latin claustrum monastic cell, from Latin: bolt, barrier, from claudere to close; influenced in form by Old French cloison partition

cloistered

/ˈklɔɪstəd/
adjective
1.
secluded or shut up from the world
2.
living in a monastery or nunnery
3.
(of a building, courtyard, etc) having or provided with a cloister
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for cloistered
cloister
c.1300, from O.Fr. clostre or O.E. clauster, both from M.L. claustrum "portion of monastery closed off to laity," from L. claustrum "place shut in, bar, bolt, enclosure," from pp. stem of claudere (see close (v.)). Sense of "enclosed space" extended to "place of religious seclusion." The verb is recorded from 1581.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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