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cobble1

[kob-uh l] /ˈkɒb əl/
verb (used with object), cobbled, cobbling.
1.
to mend (shoes, boots, etc.); patch.
2.
to put together roughly or clumsily.
Origin of cobble1
1490-1500
1490-1500; apparently back formation from cobbler

cobble2

[kob-uh l] /ˈkɒb əl/
noun
1.
a cobblestone.
2.
cobbles, coal in lumps larger than a pebble and smaller than a boulder.
3.
Metalworking.
  1. a defect in a rolled piece resulting from loss of control over its movement.
  2. Slang. a piece showing bad workmanship.
verb (used with object), cobbled, cobbling.
4.
to pave with cobblestones.
Origin
1595-1605; perhaps cob + -le; see cobblestone

cobble3

[kob-uh l] /ˈkɒb əl/
noun
1.
New England, New York State, and New Jersey. (especially in placenames) a rounded hill.
Origin
1885-95; perhaps < cobble2
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for cobbles
Historical Examples
  • Then he went to the inn, took supper, and lighting his pipe, paced the cobbles and waited.

    The Secret Witness George Gibbs
  • The beast sprang forward, with a shower of sparks from the cobbles.

    Nicanor - Teller of Tales C. Bryson Taylor
  • The old arcaded streets were asleep, and grass sprouted among the cobbles.

    My Friend the Chauffeur C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson
  • I'd like to see you coming through our wood and across the cobbles.

    Moor Fires E. H. (Emily Hilda) Young
  • The stones used are cobbles, six or eight inches through at the greatest diameter, and usually flattish.

  • The Plaza is paved with cobbles, which are disadvantageous for dancing.

    Northern Spain Edgar T. A. Wigram
  • Stumps by the hundred, three to fifteen feet high, rooted in a stream of fine blue mud on cobbles, still have their bark on.

    Travels in Alaska John Muir
  • There was a glimmer on the cobbles, and the faint outline of a lamp turned on its side.

    The Great Airship. F. S. Brereton
  • Although the streets were paved with cobbles the people moved about silently, softly, with padded feet, like cats.

    Three John Silence Stories Algernon Blackwood
  • There came the sound of steps on the cobbles, and then a heavy blow upon the door.

    The Great Airship. F. S. Brereton
British Dictionary definitions for cobbles

cobbles

/ˈkɒbəlz/
plural noun
1.
coal in small rounded lumps
2.
cobblestones

cobble1

/ˈkɒbəl/
noun
1.
short for cobblestone
2.
(geology) a rock fragment, often rounded, with a diameter of 64–256 mm and thus smaller than a boulder but larger than a pebble
verb
3.
(transitive) to pave (a road) with cobblestones
See also cobbles
Derived Forms
cobbled, adjective
Word Origin
C15 (in cobblestone): from cob1

cobble2

/ˈkɒbəl/
verb (transitive)
1.
to make or mend (shoes)
2.
to put together clumsily
Word Origin
C15: back formation from cobbler1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for cobbles

cobble

n.

"paving stone; worn, rounded stone," c.1600, earlier cobblestone, probably a diminutive of cob in some sense. The verb in this sense is from 1690s. Related: Cobbled; cobbling.

v.

"to mend clumsily," late 15c., perhaps a back-formation from cobbler (n.1), or from cob, via a notion of lumps. Related: Cobbled; cobbling.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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cobbles in Science
cobble
  (kŏb'əl)   
A rock fragment larger than a pebble and smaller than a boulder. Pebbles have a diameter between 64 and 256 mm (2.56 and 10.24 inches) and are often rounded.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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13
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